Police have made contact with missing Gabby Petito’s boyfriend

Police in Florida were seen dropping off a pink envelope at the home of missing Long Island woman Gabby Petito‘s boyfriend — as authorities say they’re preparing for the possibility that something “sinister” has happened to her.

Petito, 22, was last known to be in Wyoming’s Grand Teton National Park in late August while on a cross-country road trip in a converted van with her boyfriend, Brian Laundrie, who has since returned to his home in North Port, Florida — located between Tampa and Fort Meyers.

Exclusive photos obtained by The Post show cops dropping off an envelope outside Laundrie’s home.

North Port police said they attempted to talk to Laundrie, but were rebuffed by his parents, who put them in touch with his attorney.

“We talked with his parents, who did not make him available,” North Port police spokesman Josh Taylor told The Post.

Taylor denied a report that authorities had made contact with Laundrie directly.  

“We would love to [talk to him]. He certainly has whatever rights he has available. We will see how it goes, we are roughly 72 hours into this,” he said.

Police arrive at the North Port, Florida, home of Brian Laundrie and leave an envelope at his door on September 14, 2021.
MiamiPIXX / BACKGRID
Police arrive at the North Port home of Brian Laundrie and leave an envelope at his door this morning.
Gabby Petito was reported missing by her family on September 11, 2021.
MiamiPIXX / BACKGRID
North Port police said they told to speak with Brian Laundrie's attorney after being rebuffed by his parents.
North Port police said they were told to speak with Brian Laundrie’s attorney after being rebuffed by his parents.
MiamiPIXX / BACKGRID

Taylor said he wasn’t aware of the envelope dropoff Tuesday.

Meanwhile, police have seized the converted van the couple had been traveling in from his home.

“It’s here at the police department. It will be processed with the FBI,” Taylor said.

In a text message to The Post on Tuesday, Petito’s father, Joe, said that authorities were combing through data as part of their search for his daughter.

“I was told a lot of great work was done yesterday by the FBI, but they’re still going through a lot of data,” he said. “Everyone has been amazing in helping to try to find Gabby.”

Gabby’s family said they became concerned about Petito’s whereabouts after several days passed since she last contacted her mother on Aug. 25.

She was reported missing Saturday to authorities in Suffolk County, New York, where her family still lives, and North Port police are assisting with the investigation.

Gabby Petito's family declined to comment on her relationship with Brian Laundrie (left).
Gabby Petito’s family declined to comment on her relationship with Brian Laundrie (left).
Instagram

“We’re hopeful that she’s out there somewhere, sometimes people just don’t want to communicate so that’s certainly still a viable option but we have to prepare for something more sinister,” Taylor told news station Fox 13.

Petito’s family on Monday declined to comment on her relationship with Laundrie.

“I want to keep the focus on finding [Gabby],” her father Joe told The Post amid questions about what happened to his daughter. “[Laundrie] doesn’t matter. The van [they were in] doesn’t matter.”

The Post has been unable to reach Laundrie.



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Wyoming lawmakers to introduce bill to combat critical race theory in schools

Republicans in the Wyoming Legislature hope to prevent critical race theory (CRT) from being taught in the state’s schools by introducing a bill that they argue will increase curriculum transparency for parents and taxpayers.

Wyoming Senate Majority Floor Leader Ogden Driskill, R-Devils Tower, and Senate President Dan Dockstader, R-Afton, announced Friday they are co-sponsoring the Civics Transparency Act , which they said is intended to give parents more access to what is going on in their children’s classrooms.

“Curriculum and materials and anything that’s going in the classrooms as a whole will be posted on a website so that you the public, and you as parents, have the ability to see what’s being taught to your kids and what the curriculum is,” Driskill said during a press conference Friday. “It’s a transparency bill, it is not a bill that dictates.”

In recent years, parents across the county have become more concerned and vocal about what they argue are biased political teachings in classrooms.

CRT proponents argue that “the law and legal institutions in the United States are inherently racist insofar as they function to create and maintain social, economic, and political inequalities between whites and nonwhites, especially African Americans,” according to Britannica’s definition.

State Superintendent of Public Instruction Jillian Balow explained that CRT has evolved into an umbrella term that encompasses a range of topics not consistent with the founding of the United States. Balow said that the teachings separate people by race and deliver a message that we are different, not equal.

“There are classrooms in the state that have discussed CRT related topics such as white oppression, systemic racism and white privilege,” Balow said. “The single most important topic in this bill is that parents, taxpayers and school board members are empowered. Empowered with more transparency and an expectation for accountability for what is taught in our schools in Wyoming.”

The draft bill does not ban material or make decisions on what local districts should be teaching, but would make classroom material public so that taxpayers and parents can view them.

The legislation also provides guidance on American and Wyoming history instruction, but its backers say it does not attempt to steer students away from negative parts of the nation’s past such as slavery.

The proposed bill will first go to a committee for review and will need a two-thirds introduction vote to move forward. If it successfully passes all steps, the requirements would take effect July 1, 2022.





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Jackson, Wyoming, Explodes In A Sea Of American Flags And 600 Harleys To Honor Fallen Son, Marine LCPL Rylee McCollum

Jackson, Wyoming, was stormed Friday afternoon with a sea of red, white and blue and 600 Harleys to honor Marine LCPL Rylee McCollum, one of the 13 Americans killed in a suicide-bomber explosion outside the Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul, Afghanistan.

Hundreds of people lined the streets with American flags during McCollum’s police-escorted funeral process downtown, and held their hands over their hearts as “The Star-Spangled Banner” was played.

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A throng of Harley motorcycles also rode through the streets.

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A band joined the tribute, playing patriotic music in the city’s square. (RELATED: Family Of Fallen Marine Honored With Police Escort In Wyoming Town, Video Shows)

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Twenty-year-old McCollum lived 45 minutes from Jackson. A newlywed, McCollum was expecting a baby in three weeks before he tragically perished Aug. 26, according to the Casper Star Tribune. He was said to be manning a checkpoint at the airport in Kabul. It was his first deployment.

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McCollum “wanted to be a Marine his whole life and carried around his rifle in his diapers and cowboy boots,” said his sister, Roice McCollum, according to The Casper Star Tribune. “He was determined to be in infantry … Rylee wanted to be a history teacher and a wrestling coach when he finished serving his country. He’s a tough, kind, loving kid who made an impact on everyone he met.”

“Rylee will always be a hero not just for the ultimate sacrifice he made for our country, but for the way he impacted every life around for the better,” she said.

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President Joe Biden spoke with the family members of the 13 killed service members after he attended their dignified transfer to Walter Reed National Medical Center on Sept. 2. McCollum’s sister responded to Biden’s speech by saying that the president had shown “a total disregard to the loss of our Marine.”

“You can’t fuck up as bad as he did and say you’re sorry,” she said. “This did not need to happen, and every life is on his hands.”

One man held a flag with the words “F*ck Biden,” “And f*ck you for voting for him,” on it, during Friday’s ceremony.

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Rylee and Roice’s mother, Kathy McCollum, also commented on the response of the Biden administration during a radio interview.

“My son did die in vain. This was an unnecessary debacle. It could have been handled properly. They had months and months to remove everyone from Afghanistan and they chose not to,” Kathy McCollum said.

“I never thought in a million years that he would die for nothing. For nothing. Because a feckless dementia-ridden piece of crap wanted a photo-op on Sept. 11, that’s what kills me,” she said.





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Wyoming troop deaths 20 years apart bookend Afghanistan war

CHEYENNE, Wyo. — When news came that a 20-year-old Wyoming soldier was one of the last casualties of the two-decade-long U.S. war in Afghanistan, it arrived as a tragic bookend: A 20-year-old soldier from Wyoming was among the first to die in the same war.

Army Ranger Spc. Jonn Edmunds, of Cheyenne, was one of the war’s first two casualties when a Black Hawk helicopter on a search-and-rescue mission crashed in Pakistan on Oct. 19, 2001.

Last month, the family of Marine Lance Cpl. Rylee McCollum, of Bondurant just outside Jackson, got word he was among 13 U.S. soldiers killed in a suicide bombing Aug. 26 at the Kabul airport.

Edmunds and McCollum were both killed on their first deployments. In between, almost 2,500 U.S. troops died in the Afghanistan war, most with far less attention than the two Wyoming men got.

As with Edmunds’ death in the chaotic aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, McCollum’s strikes an especially sad chord as Americans struggle to process what good — if any — has come from their nation’s longest war.

“That was a totally senseless death,” Edmunds’ father, Donn Edmunds, said of McCollum. “Seeing the other people losing their loved ones, all that does is bring back bad memories for my family.”

A 25-year U.S. Army veteran who served in Vietnam, Edmunds remembers how two officers knocked on his door on the outskirts of Cheyenne before sunrise on Oct. 20, 2001, bringing word of his son’s death.

“I looked out the window, I saw them standing there and all I could think was ‘Oh my God, I know what they’re here for.’ I’ve done notifications so I knew,” said Edmunds, who as a military police officer participated in telling relatives of loved ones’ deaths. He got choked up and quiet while looking at a display of his son’s medals and the folded American flag presented to him and other families of fallen soldiers.

“They came in and gave us the ‘Regret to inform you’ speech. My wife had been up by then, and I watched her melt into this carpet right here on the floor,” Edmunds recalled. “And they asked, ‘Is there anything we can do?’ and we said, ‘No, just let us absorb this, and we have to be able to accept this.’”

Wyoming is the least populated state and one that values tradition: rodeo and county fairs in summer, elk hunting in fall, calving season in spring and military service.

Donn Edmunds is a 25-year U.S. Army veteran who served in Vietnam.
Thomas Peipert/AP

Jonn Edmunds and his friends grew up playing with water guns, then laser tag in the family’s big yard. Eventually the honors student moved up to paintball, Donn Edmunds recalled.

“We used to have the guys from the Air Force come out here. And they’d knock on the door and say, ‘Can Jonn come out and play paintball with us?’” he said.

On the opposite side of Cheyenne, F.E. Warren Air Force Base has overseen nuclear missiles in silos beneath the Wyoming, Colorado and Nebraska plains since the 1960s. Each July, the city hosts its massive Cheyenne Frontier Days rodeo festival but Cheyenne has always been a military town at heart.

Like Edmunds, McCollum seemed born with soldiering in his blood.

He grew up in the Jackson Hole area, a region of rugged, forested mountains and big-time outdoors culture on the other side of Wyoming from Cheyenne. Even as a toddler, McCollum played with toy rifles, pretending he was a soldier or hunter, relatives said.

As a high school wrestler, he distinguished himself by training intensely. At school, in 2017, he and his father spoke out publicly when a multiple-choice quiz for a reading assignment facetiously offered “shooting at Trump” as an answer.

Jackson, where McCollum graduated from high school, is a wealthy ski and summer tourism enclave near Grand Teton and Yellowstone national parks that many in Wyoming view as socioeconomically out of step and politically more moderate than the rest of the state.

Yet the town of 10,000 has shown no less respect for veterans and military service, especially over the past 20 years, said Joseph Burke, commander of the local American Legion post.

Army Ranger Spc. Jonn Edmunds, who along with another soldier, died when a Black Hawk helicopter on a search-and-rescue mission crashed in Pakistan in October 2001.
Army Ranger Spc. Jonn Edmunds, who along with another soldier, died when a Black Hawk helicopter on a search-and-rescue mission crashed in Pakistan in October 2001.
Thomas Peipert/AP

“It was around 9/11 that people started to recognize veterans, the sacrifices they and their families really made,” Burke said. “We’ve got kids who go in the service from here all the time.”

McCollum’s widow, Jiennah Crayton, is due to deliver a baby in a couple of weeks and the family plans a memorial service sometime after. Meanwhile, three online fundraising efforts have brought in over $900,000 for Crayton and the child’s education.

After Jonn Edmunds’ death, television trucks lined up outside the family’s home. Reporters gathered at their daughter’s school, Donn Edmunds recalled, and the family lived like “hermits” for a few weeks.

At a memorial service that filled a 4,500-seat gym, Jonn Edmunds’ commanding officer remembered him as a gritty soldier who still had “that intense look on his face” even after other soldiers looked tired.

Such crowds wouldn’t always show up, however, at services for soldiers killed in Afghanistan and Iraq over the next two decades.

“Yeah, people got numb. But the families that were affected never got numb,” Edmunds said.

The Edmunds family received about $24,000 in donations which they gave away to causes including the Wounded Warrior Project, a charity for troops wounded since 2001, Edmunds said.

He has spent the years since his son’s death riding his Harley-Davidson with the Patriot Guard Riders, a biker group that helps maintain decorum at military funerals, running unsuccessfully for the Wyoming Legislature and trying to raise interest in establishing a veterans memorial park. Now he’s thinking about suing the U.S. government over its withdrawal from Afghanistan, which he criticized as poorly organized.

“All of these people’s sons were great. Every one of them was a traumatic loss for their family. And the thing about it is, what for?” Edmunds said. “We have abandoned their mission.”

The work of consoling and counseling grief-stricken relatives, however, was therapeutic both for him and for relatives, said Edmunds, 72, who runs a security business.

Donn Edmunds, a 25-year U.S. Army veteran who served in Vietnam, sits in his living room in Cheyenne, Wyo.
Thomas Peipert/AP

A woman once asked at an event held by the Army’s Survivor Outreach Services family support group whether losing a loved one ever got easier, Edmunds recalled.

“I said ‘Ma’am, it will never get easier. The only thing that will happen to you is time will separate you from the event,’” Edmunds said.



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Wyoming lawmakers to introduce bill to combat critical race theory in schools

Republicans in the Wyoming Legislature hope to prevent critical race theory (CRT) from being taught in the state’s schools by introducing a bill that they argue will increase curriculum transparency for parents and taxpayers.

Wyoming Senate Majority Floor Leader Ogden Driskill, R-Devils Tower, and Senate President Dan Dockstader, R-Afton, announced Friday they are co-sponsoring the Civics Transparency Act, which they said is intended to give parents more access to what is going on in their children’s classrooms.

“Curriculum and materials and anything that’s going in the classrooms as a whole will be posted on a website so that you the public, and you as parents, have the ability to see what’s being taught to your kids and what the curriculum is,” Driskill said during a press conference Friday. “It’s a transparency bill, it is not a bill that dictates.”

In recent years, parents across the county have become more concerned and vocal about what they argue are biased political teachings in classrooms.

CRT proponents argue that “the law and legal institutions in the United States are inherently racist insofar as they function to create and maintain social, economic, and political inequalities between whites and nonwhites, especially African Americans,” according to Britannica’s definition.

State Superintendent of Public Instruction Jillian Balow explained that CRT has evolved into an umbrella term that encompasses a range of topics not consistent with the founding of the United States. Balow said that the teachings separate people by race and deliver a message that we are different, not equal.

“There are classrooms in the state that have discussed CRT related topics such as white oppression, systemic racism and white privilege,” Balow said. “The single most important topic in this bill is that parents, taxpayers and school board members are empowered. Empowered with more transparency and an expectation for accountability for what is taught in our schools in Wyoming.”

The draft bill does not ban material or make decisions on what local districts should be teaching, but would make classroom material public so that taxpayers and parents can view them.

The legislation also provides guidance on American and Wyoming history instruction, but its backers say it does not attempt to steer students away from negative parts of the nation’s past such as slavery.

The proposed bill will first go to a committee for review and will need a two-thirds introduction vote to move forward. If it successfully passes all steps, the requirements would take effect July 1, 2022.



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Trump Backs Wyoming Attorney Harriet Hageman Against Liz Cheney

Former President Donald Trump officially endorsed Wyoming attorney Harriet Hageman in a crowded Republican primary against Rep. Liz Cheney.

“Harriet is a fourth-generation daughter of Wyoming, a very successful attorney, and has the support and respect of a truly great U.S. Senator, Wyoming’s own Cynthia Lummis,” Trump wrote in a Thursday statement. “Harriet Hageman adores the Great State of Wyoming, is strong on Crime and Borders, powerfully supports the Second Amendment, loves our Military and our Vets, and will fight for Election Integrity and Energy Independence (which Biden has already given up). Unlike RINO Liz Cheney, Harriet is all in for America First.”

The coveted endorsement aims to narrow a crowded field of candidates to a two-way race to deny Cheney a fourth term captured by a plurality. The former president had been meeting with both announced and unannounced contenders from his Florida residence in recent months as he prepared to back a challenger. According to Politico, Trump met with State Rep. Chuck Gray, state Sen. Bo Biteman, attorney Darin Smith, and Catharine O’Neill, who worked in the president’s administration. Of those he met with, however, Hageman “impressed him the most,” Politico reported, citing people close to the process. Biteman and O’Neill still have not entered the race.

Hageman had previously made an unsuccessful run for governor in 2018, and until recently was a Cheney ally who had donated to the congresswoman’s past campaigns.

Cheney’s recent poll numbers signal trouble for the incumbent representative in a state Trump carried by a far wider margin in 2016 than the at-large representative did in her first election to the lower chamber. Trump carried the state by more than a 45-point margin. Cheney won by 32 percentage points.

Results of a new survey out in late July by McLaughlin & Associates reported exclusively by the Washington Examiner showed 77 percent of GOP primary voters said they would back a candidate other than Cheney in the upcoming contests, while only 23 percent said they’d send their congresswoman back to Washington another two years.

Competing in a field with multiple candidates, Cheney won the Republican primary in 2016 with less than 40 percent of the vote. Unless the party coalesces around a single candidate, that candidate now likely Hageman, Cheney stands a good chance at another term despite near-constant antagonism toward Republican voters.

In May, the House Republicans stripped Cheney of her No. 3 role in leadership as conference chair.





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Trump endorses Harriet Hageman, primary opponent to Liz Cheney in Wyoming

Former President Donald Trump has chosen a candidate to endorse in the race to unseat Republican Congresswoman Liz Cheney in Wyoming.

Harriet Hageman earned Trump’s endorsement Thursday morning in a statement that read, “I strongly endorse Republican House of Representatives Candidate Harriet Hageman from Wyoming who is running against warmonger and disloyal Republican, Liz Cheney.”

Harriet, an attorney and fourth-generation “daughter of Wyoming,” has the backing of current Wyoming Senator Cynthia Lummis (R).

“Unlike RINO Liz Cheney, Harriet is all in for America First. Harriet has my Complete and Total Endorsement in replacing the Democrats number one provider of sound bites, Liz Cheney,” wrote Trump. 

Unseating Cheney has been a primary focus of the former president’s since she led a group of Republican lawmakers who voted in favor of the second impeachment of Donald Trump. Upon leaving office, he committed time and again to campaigning again Cheney, among other Republicans who he views as “disloyal.” 



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‘He Was So Excited To Be A Dad’: Wyoming Native And Father-To-Be Among Marines Killed In Kabul Attack

One of the United States military members killed in the ISIS attack at Kabul Airport was expecting to become a father in three weeks, the Washington Post reported Friday.

Rylee McCollum was married with a baby on the way, Cheyenne McCollum, his sister, told the Washington Post. He was a native of Bondurant, Wyoming.

“He was so excited to be a dad, and he was going to be a great dad,” McCollum said, according to the Washington Post.

Cheyenne also raved about her brother’s dedication to being a Marine. Ryan “was a Marine before he knew he was allowed to be a Marine,” she reportedly said. “He’d carry around his toy rifle and wear his sister’s pink princess snow boots and he’d either be hunting or he was a Marine. Sometimes it would be with nothing on underneath, just a T-shirt.” (RELATED: ‘He Was Just A Kid’: Sister Speaks Out After Navy Corpsman Brother Identified As Victim Of Kabul Attack)

Ryan was one of the 11 Marines who died in Thursday’s bombing by ISIS-K at Kabul Airport. An Army soldier and Navy sailor were also among the casualties. 18 other U.S. military members were wounded in the attack, which resulted in the most troops killed in action in a single day in Afghanistan since 2011.

Cheyenne revealed that her brother wanted to be a history teacher and a wrestling coach after he completed his military service, the Washington Post reported. Regi Stone, a father of a friend of Rylee McCollum’s lauded him as resilient, smart, and courageous. He described him as “a good kid,” according to the Washington Post.

“We want to make sure that people know that these are the kids that are sacrificing themselves, and he’s got a family who loves him and a wife who loves him and a baby that he’ll never get to meet,” Cheyenne McCollum reportedly said.





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Rep. Boebert: Slain Wyoming Marine’s ‘blood is on Joe Biden’s hands’

BEAVER CREEK, Colorado | Rep. Lauren Boebert, Colorado Republican, lashed out Friday at President Biden after she spoke to a Colorado mother whose son was among the Marines killed in Afghanistan on Thursday, saying that “his blood is on Joe Biden’s hands.”

In remarks at the Steamboat Institute Freedom Conference, Ms. Boebert said she talked with a woman in her western Colorado district who lost her son in the Thursday terrorist attack at the Kabul airport that left at least 13 military members dead and 18 injured.

“I just had one of the most disturbing phone calls I’ve ever experienced in my entire life,” Ms. Boebert said. “I had to pull the car over and speak to a new Gold Star mother in my district. Her son since [he was] 8 years old has spoken about serving our country.

“But yesterday was inexcusable. Yesterday, he was one of the 13 Marines that we lost in vain in Afghanistan.

“And I make no apology after hearing the voice of his mother in saying that his blood is on Joe Biden’s hands,” Ms. Boebert said. “Her son was murdered yesterday because of this poor execution of getting our troops, our American citizens out of Afghanistan. This has been disgusting and shameful.”

The names of the 13 slain service members have not been released, but Ms. Boebert’s office said the Marine was Rylee McCollum of Wyoming and that his mother lives in the congresswoman’s district.

Wyoming Gov. Mark Gordon on Friday ordered the U.S. and state flags to be flown at half-staff until Monday to honor Lance Cpl. McCollum, who was 20.

“I’m devastated to learn Wyoming lost one of our own in yesterday’s terrorist attack in Kabul,” Mr. Gordon said. “Our thoughts and prayers are with the family and friends of Rylee McCollum of Bondurant. Jennie and I, along with all of Wyoming and the entire country thank Rylee for his service.”

Ms. Boebert drew enthusiastic applause after announcing that her office is drafting articles of impeachment “for everyone who is involved in this,” referring to the botched U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan.

She urged House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy to bring House Republicans back even if House Speaker Nancy Pelosi refuses to do so before the chamber’s recess ends Sept. 20.

Mr. McCarthy called Thursday on the House to reconvene before President Biden’s self-imposed Aug. 31 deadline to evacuate Americans, which Pelosi deputy chief of staff Drew Hammill dismissed on Twitter as “empty stunts & distraction.”

The House returned on Monday and Tuesday to pass the $3.5 trillion budget framework and infrastructure plan, then went back into recess until Sept. 20.

“If we can be called back into session to bring about trillions and trillions of debt to the national debt, to talk about so-called infrastructure and a sham budget reconciliation, we damn sure can be called back to Congress for this,” Ms. Boebert said to applause.

The 13th annual conference at the Park Hyatt drew 370 attendees, the largest crowd in the conservative institute’s history. The two-day event ends Saturday.

Also speaking were Colorado Gov. Jared Polis, Woodson Center founder Robert L. Woodson, economist Arthur Laffer, University of California Berkeley law professor John Yoo, and retired Vanderbilt University professor Carol Swain.

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Woman jailed for walking across Yellowstone geyser

A Connecticut woman was sentenced to a week behind bars — and must pay more than $2,000 in fines — after she walked across a thermal area in Yellowstone National Park, federal prosecutors said this week. 

Madeline S. Casey, 26, of New Hartford, was charged with walking off the boardwalk and stepping onto thermal ground as she made her way up to a thermal pool and geyser at Norris Geyser Basin, according to a press release from the US Attorney’s Office for the District of Wyoming. 

She was with two other people during the excursion, one of whom also stepped onto the thermal ground, prosecutors said. 

Multiple concerned bystanders took photos of the trespassers in the area — which is well-marked with signs warning people to stay on the boardwalk. 

Multiple concerned bystanders took photos of the trespassers in the area — which is well-marked with signs warning people to stay on the boardwalk.
Natalie Behring/Getty Images

Casey was ordered spend seven days in jail, as well as pay a $1,000 fine, $40 in fees and a $1,000 community service payment to the Yellowstone Forever Geological Resource Fund during an Aug. 18 appearance in front of Magistrate Judge Mark L. Carmon in Mammoth Hot Springs, Wyoming, according to the release.

“For those who lack a natural ability to appreciate the dangerousness of crusty and unstable ground, boiling water, and scalding mud, the National Park Service does a darn good job of warning them to stay on the boardwalk and trial in thermal areas,” Acting United States Attorney Bob Murray, of the District of Wyoming, said in a statement.

“Yet there will always be those like Ms. Casey who don’t get it,” he said. “Although a criminal prosecution and jail time may seem harsh, it’s better than spending time in a hospital’s burn unit.”

Since 1870, more than 20 people have died of burns after entering or falling into Yellowstone’s hot springs, The Billings Gazette reported

General views of Crackling Lake in the Norris Geyser Basin at Yellowstone National Park on May 27, 2021 in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming.
In one 2016 incident, an Oregon man ventured off-trail and attempted to soak in a pool with a later-recorded temperature of 212 degrees, according to the report. His body was dissolved by the scorching temperature.
AaronP/Bauer-Griffin/GC Images via Getty Images

In one 2016 incident, an Oregon man ventured off-trail and attempted to soak in a pool with a later-recorded temperature of 212 degrees, according to the report. 

The man’s body had already dissolved into the scorching, acidic water by the time a recovery team returned the next day, the outlet reported. 

“Boardwalks in geyser basins protect visitors and delicate thermal formations,” Yellowstone National Park Public Affairs Officer Morgan Warthin said in a statement. “The ground is fragile and thin and scalding water just below the surface can cause severe or fatal burns.”



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