Top 25 roundup: Fresno State shocks No. 13 UCLA with late TD

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Jake Haener threw his two touchdown passes in the final 2:55, including a 13-yard game-winner to Jalen Cropper with 14 seconds remaining, and Fresno State survived to upset No. 13 UCLA 40-37 on Saturday in Pasadena, Calif.

Haener finished with 455 yards passing. Running back Ronnie Rivers, who rushed for 136 yards, scored on touchdown runs of 1 yard and 36 yards in the first half, and Cropper scored on a goal-line carry as the Bulldogs exploited a 49-16 disparity in plays run over the first two periods.

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Fresno State (3-1) built a 23-10 lead at halftime over a UCLA team playing its first game since a Sept. 4 upset of LSU, but the Bruins (2-1) came back, holding Fresno State out of the end zone for more than 33 minutes of game time after the second of Rivers’ touchdowns, and Philips had 113 yards receiving.

Quarterback Dorian Thompson-Robinson threw three touchdown passes, including a pair to Kyle Philips, and Zach Charbonnet rushed for the second of two touchdowns in the fourth quarter to give UCLA two different leads. Thompson-Robinson went 14-of-24 for 278 yards.

No. 1 Alabama 31, No. 11 Florida 29

The Crimson Tide got three touchdown passes from freshman Bryce Young and stopped a potential game-tying 2-point conversion late in the fourth quarter to hold off the Gators in Gainesville, Fla.

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The Gators (2-1, 0-1 SEC) pulled within two points with 3:10 left in the game on a 17-yard touchdown run by Dameon Pierce. But Malik Davis’ 2-point attempt to even the score failed. The Gators missed an extra-point try in the second quarter, setting up the two-point deficit.

Young completed 22 of 35 passes for 233 yards and no interceptions in his first true road start for Alabama (3-0, 1-0). Emory Jones completed 17 of 27 passes for 181 yards and an interception for the Gators, his fifth in three games. He also rushed for 80 yards and a touchdown on 19 carries, while Davis added a game-high 96 rushing yards on 11 attempts.

No. 2 Georgia 40, South Carolina 13

JT Daniels threw for 303 yards and three touchdowns to lead the Bulldogs to a victory over the visiting Gamecocks (2-1, 0-1 SEC) in the SEC opener for both teams in Athens, Ga.

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Adonai Mitchell caught four passes for a team-high 77 yards. Kendall Milton (66 yards) James Cook (51 yards) and Zamir White (51 yards) powered a ground game that rushed for 184 yards on 31 carries — an average of 5.9 yards per attempt — as the Bulldogs amassed 491 yards of total offense.

Georgia (3-0, 1-0 SEC) needed just six plays to take a 7-0 lead, as Cook capped a 75-yard drive with a 23-yard burst up the middle less than three minutes into the game.

No. 3 Oklahoma 23, Nebraska 16

Spencer Rattler threw for 214 yards and a touchdown as the Sooners (3-0) beat the visiting Cornhuskers (2-2). The Sooners’ 23 points were their fewest in more than five years.

Nebraska got the ball back with a chance to force overtime in the final minute, before a pair of Sooners sacks, and then a stop of Rahmir Johnson just short of the first-down marker ended the game.

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Oklahoma managed just 408 total yards, with 194 on the ground. Eric Gray ran 15 times for 84 yards for the Sooners.

No. 4 Oregon 48, Stony Brook 7

Freshman quarterback Ty Thompson threw the first two touchdown passes of his college career after taking over for injured Anthony Brown in the third quarter, helping the Ducks pull away from the visiting Seawolves in a nonconference game.

In a game delayed 37 minutes by lightning, the Ducks nabbed three interceptions and a fumble to dispatch the Seawolves. One week after Oregon beat Ohio State in Columbus, the Ducks (3-0) led only 17-7 at halftime. Thompson went 6-for-9 for 82 yards, while Brown completed 14 of 18 passes for 159 yards and one touchdown in the first half

Ty Son Lawton scored on a 5-yard run on the final play of the first quarter to keep the Seawolves (1-2) close. Stony Brook quarterback Tyquell Fields was 10-for-23 passing for 131 yards. Three of his completions went to Shawn Harris Jr., who accumulated a game-high 67 receiving yards.

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No. 5 Iowa 30, Kent State 7

The Hawkeyes — helped by an incredible 20-play, 95-yard drive — defeated the visiting Golden Flashes (1-2) in nonconference play at Iowa City.

Tyler Goodson ran for 153 yards, a 7.0 average, and three touchdowns to lead the Hawkeyes (3-0), who have won nine straight games dating to last season.

Iowa quarterback Spencer Petras completed 25 of 36 passes for 209 yards and one touchdown with no interceptions.

No. 6 Clemson 14, Georgia Tech 8

Will Shipley rushed for 88 yards and two touchdowns as the Tigers survived the Yellow Jackets as well as an extended lightning delay en route to a victory at Clemson’s Memorial Stadium.

Clemson (2-1) notched its 30th consecutive home victory, extending the school record as well as the nation’s longest active home winning streak. The Tigers have won seven consecutive games against the Yellow Jackets (1-2), but got more than they bargained for.

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Georgia Tech outplayed Clemson for much of the game and outgained the Tigers 309-284, but Clemson’s defense came up big in crucial situations. Linebacker James Skalski thwarted a shovel pass from Georgia Tech quarterback Jordan Yates to Dylan Deveney on fourth-and-goal from the Clemson 2-yard line with 15 seconds remaining as the Tigers survived in the ACC opener for both teams.

No. 7 Texas A&M 34, New Mexico 0

Zach Calzada passed for 275 yards and three touchdowns as the Aggies rolled over the Lobos in College Station, Texas.

Calzada completed 19 of 33 passes with one interception in his first career start for the Aggies (3-0), who won their 11th consecutive game and posted their first shutout since September 2016 against Prairie View A&M.

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The 11-game win streak is the program’s longest since 1992 and Texas A&M is off to its best start since opening 6-0 in 2016.

No. 8 Cincinnati 38, Indiana 24

Demond Ridder connected with Alec Pierce on a 19-yard touchdown pass early in the fourth quarter to fuel the Bearcats over the Hoosiers in Bloomington, Ind.

Ridder completed 20 of 36 passes for 210 yards and Jerome Ford added 66 yards rushing and two touchdowns for the Bearcats (3-0), who have won 13 of their last 14 games.

Indiana (1-2) turned it over four times, including twice in the red zone, with a fumble by running back Tim Baldwin Jr. at Cincinnati’s 2-yard line negating a potential go-ahead score midway through the fourth quarter.

No. 9 Ohio State 41, Tulsa 20

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TreVeyon Henderson broke two-time Heisman Trophy winner Archie Griffin’s Ohio State freshman single-game rushing record with 277 yards and added three touchdowns as the Buckeyes (2-1) pulled away late from the visiting Golden Hurricane.

Henderson’s 52-yard score to make it 27-13 on the last play of the third quarter gave him 243 yards, four more than Griffin had against North Carolina on Sept. 30, 1972. He ran for a 48-yard TD on Ohio State’s fifth snap of the third quarter for a 20-6 lead. He also had 5-yard TD among his 24 carries.

For Tulsa (0-3), quarterback Davis Brin had a 22-yard TD to Josh Johnson with 12:07 to play to make it 27-20. Davis threw for 428 yards against an embattled Ohio State defense.

No. 10 Penn State 28, No. 22 Auburn 20

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Sean Clifford threw two touchdown passes to lead the Nittany Lions past the Tigers in an exciting nonconference matchup in University Park, Pa.

The Nittany Lions (3-0) led throughout the second half, but the Tigers (2-1) drove to the Penn State 2 in the waning minutes. On fourth down, Bo Nix’s pass fell incomplete to Kobe Hudson, who got tangled up with Penn State safety Jaquan Brisker, but no flags were thrown.

Clifford finished 28 of 32 for 280 yards, while Jahan Dotson hauled in 10 receptions for 78 yards and a score. Noah Cain and Tyler Warren rushed for touchdowns for the Nittany Lions. Nix was 21 of 37 for 185 yards without a touchdown or an interception. Tank Bigsby carried 23 times for the visitors, accumulating 102 yards and two scores.

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No. 12 Notre Dame 27, Purdue 13

Jack Coan threw for 223 yards and two touchdowns as the Fighting Irish pulled away from the visiting Boilermakers (2-1) in South Bend, Ind.

Kyren Williams had a rushing and receiving touchdown for Notre Dame (3-0), which posted its biggest win of the season. Avery Davis led Fighting Irish receivers with five catches for 120 yards and a touchdown.

It was the 105th win at Notre Dame for head coach Brian Kelly. He tied Knute Rockne as the winningest coach in school history.

No. 14 Iowa State 48, UNLV 3

Brock Purdy passed for 288 yards to set the school record for career passing yards as the Cyclones rolled to victory over the Rebels (0-3) in a nonconference game in Las Vegas.

Purdy completed 21 of 24 passes for three touchdowns while increasing his yardage total to 9,607. He passed Bret Meyer, who had 9,499 from 2004-07.

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Breece Hall rushed for 100 yards and two scores on 21 carries for the Cyclones (2-1). He scored at least one rushing touchdown for the 15th straight game to tie the Big 12 record held by Missouri’s Corby Jones (1997-98).

West Virginia 27, No. 15 Virginia Tech 21

Jarret Doege threw for 193 yards and two touchdowns and Leddie Brown ran for 161 yards and a score to power the Mountaineers to an upset of the Hokies in Morgantown, W.Va.

Doege completed 15 of 26 passes and Brown averaged 8.5 yards per carry, but it was the defense that secured the victory.

The Mountaineers (2-1) capped a day in which they recorded six sacks by forcing an incomplete pass on fourth-and-goal from the 4-yard line in the final minute, preventing the Hokies (2-1) from completing their comeback from 20 points down late in the third quarter.

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No. 16 Coastal Carolina 28, Buffalo 25

Grayson McCall threw for three touchdowns and the Chanticleers held off the host Bulls (1-2) in Buffalo, N.Y.

The Chanticleers (3-0), playing in their first road game of the season, broke a halftime tie on the way to picking up their ninth straight victory in a regular-season nonconference matchup.

McCall finished 13-for-19 passing for 232 yards with an interception. Teammate Shermari Jones ran for 149 yards on 16 carries with a touchdown.

No. 17 Ole Miss 61, Tulane 21

Matt Corral tied an Ole Miss record by producing seven touchdowns — four rushing, three passing — as the Rebels throttled the Green Wave in a weather-delayed contest in Oxford, Miss.

Corral — 23-of-31 for 335 yards and no interceptions — tossed a scoring pass for his 15th straight game and added 68 yards rushing on 13 carries. The Rebels (3-0) received two touchdowns from Dontario Drummond (rushing, receiving), and a scoring reception from Jonathan Mingo (six catches, career-high 136 yards) and Braylon Sanders. Jerrion Ealy rushed 15 times for a game-high 105 yards.

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Cameron Carroll, Shae Wyatt and Tyrick James scored for the Green Wave (1-2). Michael Pratt played three quarters and finished 10-for-18 for 166 yards with two TDs and no picks.

No. 23 BYU 27, No. 19 Arizona State 17

Jaren Hall passed for 214 yards and rushed for 38 before a late injury to lead the Cougars past the Sun Devils in Provo, Utah.

Hall was hurt on a 13-yard run that took BYU (3-0) to the Arizona State 4 with 2:17 left. Backup quarterback Baylor Romney completed the game-securing touchdown pass to Isaac Rex with 1:19 left. Gunner Romney caught six passes for 95 yards and a score, and Tyler Allgeier ran for 69 yards and a touchdown for BYU (3-0).

The Sun Devils (2-1), playing their first road game with fans in the stands in two seasons, were beset by 16 penalties for 121 yards. Quarterback Jayden Daniels completed 21 of 29 pass attempts for 265 yards, with two interceptions and no touchdowns. Daniyel Ngata rushed for 82 yards and a touchdown.

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No. 20 Arkansas 45, Georgia Southern 10

KJ Jefferson threw for 366 yards and three touchdowns to lead the Razorbacks to a victory over the visiting Eagles (1-2) in a nonconference game in Fayetteville, Ark.

Dominique Johnson rushed for a team-high 72 yards and touchdown on five carries as Arkansas (3-0) ran for 269 yards on 48 carries — an average of 5.6 yards per attempt — and rolled up 633 yards of total offense.

Jefferson, who went 13-for-23 passing, highlighted his day by throwing a 91-yard touchdown pass to Treylon Burks in the third quarter. It ranked only behind Matt Jones’ 92-yard scoring strike to Richard Smith against Tennessee in 2002 in the school’s record book.

No. 21 North Carolina 59, Virginia 39

Sam Howell passed for 307 yards and five touchdowns and rushed for 112 yards to lead the Tar Heels to a shootout victory over the Cavaliers in an Atlantic Coast Conference matchup in Chapel Hill, N.C.

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Josh Downs caught eight passes for 203 yards and two touchdowns and Ty Chandler rushed for 198 yards and two scores for the Tar Heels (2-1, 1-1 ACC), who never punted and outgained Virginia 699-574.

Brennan Armstrong passed for a school-record 554 yards and four touchdowns for the Cavaliers (2-1, 0-1), who had won the last four meetings. Dontayvion Wicks had seven catches for 183 yards and a TD and Billy Kemp IV added eight grabs for 106 yards and two scores.

Michigan State 38, No. 24 Miami 17

Kenneth Walker III rushed for 172 yards, and Payton Thorne passed for 261 yards with four touchdowns, leading the visiting Spartans to an upset victory over the Hurricanes (1-2).

Michigan State (3-0) got two TD receptions from Jalen Nailor, with one each from Walker and Jayden Reed.

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Thorne’s final TD pass was a 39-yarder to Nailor with 4:12 left in the game. It came one play after Thorne’s sneak picked up a fourth-and-1 first down by just a few inches, and the Spartans up by just seven points (24-17) at the time.

No. 25 Michigan 63, Northern Illinois 10

Blake Corum rushed for 125 yards and three touchdowns as the Wolverines found the end zone on its first nine possessions in a romp over the Huskies at Ann Arbor, Mich.

Donovan Edwards gained 86 yards and scored twice, while Hassan Haskins added 56 rushing yards and two scores. The Wolverines (3-0) had 373 rushing yards on 48 carries.

Cade McNamara threw an 87-yard touchdown pass to Cornelius Johnson and also scored on a quarterback keeper.

–Field Level Media

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MLB roundup: Cardinals rally past Padres, widen wild-card lead

Sep 18, 2021; St. Louis, Missouri, USA; St. Louis Cardinals left fielder Tyler O’Neill (27) watches his two-run home run against the San Diego Padres during the eighth inning at Busch Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Joe Puetz-USA TODAY Sports

September 19, 2021

Tyler O’Neill hit a two-run homer to rally the St. Louis Cardinals past the visiting San Diego Padres 3-2 Saturday for their seventh straight victory.

O’Neill’s eighth-inning blast off reliever Emilio Pagan (4-2) erased San Diego’s 2-1 lead. The Cardinals pushed their lead over the Cincinnati Reds to two games and over the Padres to 2 1/2 games in the race for the second National League wild-card slot.

Cardinals starting pitcher Adam Wainwright allowed two runs on seven hits in six innings. Justin Miller (1-0) pitched a scoreless eighth inning to earn the victory, and Giovanny Gallegos closed out the game for his ninth save.

Padres starting pitcher Yu Darvish threw seven scoreless innings. He struck out nine batters and allowed just three hits and a walk.

Indians 11, Yankees 3

Andres Gimenez capped a seven-run fifth inning with a three-run homer, and Franmil Reyes added a two-run homer in the sixth, as visiting Cleveland rolled to a victory over New York.

Reyes drove in three runs while Yu Chang homered and drove in three for the Indians. Jose Ramirez added a late homer as Cleveland won for only the fifth time in 15 games and rebounded nicely after getting shut out in Friday’s series opener.

The Yankees lost for the 14th time in 21 games following their 13-game winning streak Aug. 14-27. New York also saw slugger Joey Gallo exit due to neck tightness following the third inning.

Red Sox 9, Orioles 3

Xander Bogaerts hit a three-run homer to highlight his three-hit performance as Boston extended its winning streak to four games with the victory over visiting Baltimore.

Rafael Devers had three hits and scored three runs for the Red Sox, who hold the top wild-card spot in the American League with 12 games to play.

Four Boston relievers combined for 5 1/3 scoreless innings. Tanner Houck (1-4) struck out three over 2 2/3 innings to record the victory.

Dodgers 5, Reds 1

Max Scherzer ran his personal win streak to 11 games after tossing seven scoreless innings while visiting Los Angeles took advantage of shoddy defense in a win over Cincinnati.

Scherzer (15-4), who took a perfect game into the eighth inning of his previous start, struck out seven and walked two. The strong pitching performance sent the Dodgers to their seventh win in the last eight games.

Scherzer is 7-0 with a 0.78 ERA in his nine starts with the Dodgers since being acquired from the Washington Nationals at the trade deadline. The Reds could muster only three hits and must win Sunday to avoid losing their eighth consecutive series.

Giants 2, Braves 0

Left-hander Alex Wood returned from a COVID-19 absence to start a seven-man shutout effort as San Francisco defeated Atlanta, which saw its lead in the National League East trimmed to one game.

Curt Casali directed a two-run single into right field to produce the game’s only runs in the fourth inning, helping the Giants beat the Braves for the second consecutive night.

Braves starter Charlie Morton (13-6) was pulled after five innings, charged with two runs on four hits. He walked three and struck out three.

Blue Jays 6, Twins 2

Teoscar Hernandez hit a three-run home run, Marcus Semien hit a solo shot and Toronto defeated visiting Minnesota.

Bo Bichette added three singles and two RBIs for the Blue Jays, who gained a split after two games of the three-game series.

Toronto holds the American League’s second wild-card spot by a half-game over New York. The Blue Jays had lost their previous eight games against the Twins at the Rogers Centre dating to 2017.

Rockies 6, Nationals 0

Kyle Freeland pitched six strong innings and visiting Colorado defeated Washington.

Brendan Rodgers had three hits, including a home run, and Trevor Story added a three-run homer for the Rockies, who have won five straight. Freeland (6-8) allowed seven hits and a walk while striking out seven. He threw 80 pitches.

Juan Soto had a single and a walk for Washington, which has lost three straight. The Nationals went 1-for-10 with runners in scoring position and were shut out for the second time this week.

Tigers 4, Rays 3

Jeimer Candelario blasted a three-run homer in the first inning and visiting Detroit held off Tampa Bay.

Dustin Garneau also homered for Detroit, which dropped the first two games of the four-game series. Jose Urena (4-8) gave up one run in 3 1/3 innings of relief while striking out four to pick up the win. Michael Fulmer worked the ninth to collect his 10th save.

Tigers center fielder Derek Hill left the game in the fifth inning with an apparent leg injury after colliding with Tampa Bay first baseman Ji-Man Choi.

Pirates 6, Marlins 3

Last-place Pittsburgh won its fourth straight series for the first time this season, defeating host Miami.

Ke’Bryan Hayes doubled twice and scored two runs to lead the Pirates. They will go for a three-game sweep of the Marlins on Sunday. Cole Tucker went 3-for-5 — his first three-hit game of the season — and Hoy Park and Kevin Newman each had two RBIs.

Marlins catcher Nick Fortes, who made his major league debut, went 2-for-3 with a two-run homer. He also singled in his first at-bat.

Rangers 2, White Sox 1

Isiah Kiner-Falefa, Nathaniel Lowe and Andy Ibanez had two hits apiece, and five pitchers combined on a three-hitter to lift host Texas to a victory over Chicago.

The White Sox were unable to inch closer to clinching the American League Central title. Chicago’s magic number remains at five over the Cleveland Indians, who routed the New York Yankees.

Texas sent Chicago to its third loss in four games behind a nine-hit attack and a resilient pitching staff. The Rangers issued seven walks but still neutralized the White Sox one night after Chicago rolled 8-0.

Royals 8, Mariners 1

Kris Bubic allowed one run on two hits over 6 1/3 innings as host Kansas City defeated Seattle in the middle game of a three-game series. The Mariners’ dwindling playoff chances took a hit, as they managed only three hits.

Bubic (5-6) earned his first win in his last five starts. It was his best outing since allowing two runs on just one hit against the Cubs in Wrigley Field on Aug. 21. He struck out two batters and walked four.

Yusei Kikuchi (7-9) lasted only three innings for the Mariners. He allowed three runs on eight hits, throwing 86 pitches.

Brewers 6, Cubs 4

Manny Pina snapped an eighth-inning tie with his second solo homer of the game to help host Milwaukee to a victory over Chicago.

Devin Williams (8-2) struck out three batters in the eighth, and Josh Hader finished for his 33rd save in 34 chances, despite allowing a walk and a single.

Jace Peterson and Eduardo Escobar also had solo homers for Milwaukee, which clinched a postseason berth thanks to losses by the San Diego Padres and the Cincinnati Reds on Saturday.

Diamondbacks 6, Astros 4 (10 innings)

Daulton Varsho slugged a two-run home run in the 10th inning and visiting Arizona squared its interleague series against Houston.

Varsho’s blast followed an RBI single by Kole Calhoun that snapped a 3-3 tie. Varsho’s 11th home run, a two-run shot off Astros right-hander Yimi Garcia (3-9), carried 431 feet to center field.

Tyler Clippard allowed an RBI single to Jason Castro in the bottom of the 10th, but Arizona improved to 6-10 in extra-inning games by winning on the road for just the 20th time in 2021.

Phillies 5, Mets 3

Jean Segura belted two home runs, Bryce Harper hit a two-run double in the seventh inning, and visiting Philadelphia continued its surge with a victory over New York.

The Phillies won for the fifth time in seven games and beat the Mets for the fifth consecutive time. They moved to within one game of the Atlanta Braves in the NL East, thanks to Atlanta’s loss to the Giants in San Francisco later Saturday.

Philadelphia right-hander Aaron Nola (8-8) allowed one run and four hits in 5 2/3 innings for his first win since July 25. He struck out nine, walked one on 96 pitches and improved to 9-3 lifetime against the Mets.

A’s 3, Angels 1

James Kaprielian allowed two hits over six shutout innings to lead Oakland to a victory over Los Angeles in Anaheim, Calif.

He retired the first six batters of the game until Jose Rojas singled to lead off the third. But Kaprielian responded by retiring the next 10 Angels hitters in a row until Jack Mayfield doubled with one out in the sixth.

Kaprielian (8-5) got out of the inning and was finished after six, having made 90 pitches, striking out five and walking nobody.

-Field Level Media





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MLB roundup: Cardinals rally past Padres, widen wild-card lead

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Tyler O’Neill hit a two-run homer to rally the St. Louis Cardinals past the visiting San Diego Padres 3-2 Saturday for their seventh straight victory.

O’Neill’s eighth-inning blast off reliever Emilio Pagan (4-2) erased San Diego’s 2-1 lead. The Cardinals pushed their lead over the Cincinnati Reds to two games and over the Padres to 2 1/2 games in the race for the second National League wild-card slot.

Cardinals starting pitcher Adam Wainwright allowed two runs on seven hits in six innings. Justin Miller (1-0) pitched a scoreless eighth inning to earn the victory, and Giovanny Gallegos closed out the game for his ninth save.

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Padres starting pitcher Yu Darvish threw seven scoreless innings. He struck out nine batters and allowed just three hits and a walk.

Indians 11, Yankees 3

Andres Gimenez capped a seven-run fifth inning with a three-run homer, and Franmil Reyes added a two-run homer in the sixth, as visiting Cleveland rolled to a victory over New York.

Reyes drove in three runs while Yu Chang homered and drove in three for the Indians. Jose Ramirez added a late homer as Cleveland won for only the fifth time in 15 games and rebounded nicely after getting shut out in Friday’s series opener.

The Yankees lost for the 14th time in 21 games following their 13-game winning streak Aug. 14-27. New York also saw slugger Joey Gallo exit due to neck tightness following the third inning.

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Red Sox 9, Orioles 3

Xander Bogaerts hit a three-run homer to highlight his three-hit performance as Boston extended its winning streak to four games with the victory over visiting Baltimore.

Rafael Devers had three hits and scored three runs for the Red Sox, who hold the top wild-card spot in the American League with 12 games to play.

Four Boston relievers combined for 5 1/3 scoreless innings. Tanner Houck (1-4) struck out three over 2 2/3 innings to record the victory.

Dodgers 5, Reds 1

Max Scherzer ran his personal win streak to 11 games after tossing seven scoreless innings while visiting Los Angeles took advantage of shoddy defense in a win over Cincinnati.

Scherzer (15-4), who took a perfect game into the eighth inning of his previous start, struck out seven and walked two. The strong pitching performance sent the Dodgers to their seventh win in the last eight games.

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Scherzer is 7-0 with a 0.78 ERA in his nine starts with the Dodgers since being acquired from the Washington Nationals at the trade deadline. The Reds could muster only three hits and must win Sunday to avoid losing their eighth consecutive series.

Giants 2, Braves 0

Left-hander Alex Wood returned from a COVID-19 absence to start a seven-man shutout effort as San Francisco defeated Atlanta, which saw its lead in the National League East trimmed to one game.

Curt Casali directed a two-run single into right field to produce the game’s only runs in the fourth inning, helping the Giants beat the Braves for the second consecutive night.

Braves starter Charlie Morton (13-6) was pulled after five innings, charged with two runs on four hits. He walked three and struck out three.

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Blue Jays 6, Twins 2

Teoscar Hernandez hit a three-run home run, Marcus Semien hit a solo shot and Toronto defeated visiting Minnesota.

Bo Bichette added three singles and two RBIs for the Blue Jays, who gained a split after two games of the three-game series.

Toronto holds the American League’s second wild-card spot by a half-game over New York. The Blue Jays had lost their previous eight games against the Twins at the Rogers Centre dating to 2017.

Rockies 6, Nationals 0

Kyle Freeland pitched six strong innings and visiting Colorado defeated Washington.

Brendan Rodgers had three hits, including a home run, and Trevor Story added a three-run homer for the Rockies, who have won five straight. Freeland (6-8) allowed seven hits and a walk while striking out seven. He threw 80 pitches.

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Juan Soto had a single and a walk for Washington, which has lost three straight. The Nationals went 1-for-10 with runners in scoring position and were shut out for the second time this week.

Tigers 4, Rays 3

Jeimer Candelario blasted a three-run homer in the first inning and visiting Detroit held off Tampa Bay.

Dustin Garneau also homered for Detroit, which dropped the first two games of the four-game series. Jose Urena (4-8) gave up one run in 3 1/3 innings of relief while striking out four to pick up the win. Michael Fulmer worked the ninth to collect his 10th save.

Tigers center fielder Derek Hill left the game in the fifth inning with an apparent leg injury after colliding with Tampa Bay first baseman Ji-Man Choi.

Pirates 6, Marlins 3

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Last-place Pittsburgh won its fourth straight series for the first time this season, defeating host Miami.

Ke’Bryan Hayes doubled twice and scored two runs to lead the Pirates. They will go for a three-game sweep of the Marlins on Sunday. Cole Tucker went 3-for-5 — his first three-hit game of the season — and Hoy Park and Kevin Newman each had two RBIs.

Marlins catcher Nick Fortes, who made his major league debut, went 2-for-3 with a two-run homer. He also singled in his first at-bat.

Rangers 2, White Sox 1

Isiah Kiner-Falefa, Nathaniel Lowe and Andy Ibanez had two hits apiece, and five pitchers combined on a three-hitter to lift host Texas to a victory over Chicago.

The White Sox were unable to inch closer to clinching the American League Central title. Chicago’s magic number remains at five over the Cleveland Indians, who routed the New York Yankees.

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Texas sent Chicago to its third loss in four games behind a nine-hit attack and a resilient pitching staff. The Rangers issued seven walks but still neutralized the White Sox one night after Chicago rolled 8-0.

Royals 8, Mariners 1

Kris Bubic allowed one run on two hits over 6 1/3 innings as host Kansas City defeated Seattle in the middle game of a three-game series. The Mariners’ dwindling playoff chances took a hit, as they managed only three hits.

Bubic (5-6) earned his first win in his last five starts. It was his best outing since allowing two runs on just one hit against the Cubs in Wrigley Field on Aug. 21. He struck out two batters and walked four.

Yusei Kikuchi (7-9) lasted only three innings for the Mariners. He allowed three runs on eight hits, throwing 86 pitches.

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Brewers 6, Cubs 4

Manny Pina snapped an eighth-inning tie with his second solo homer of the game to help host Milwaukee to a victory over Chicago.

Devin Williams (8-2) struck out three batters in the eighth, and Josh Hader finished for his 33rd save in 34 chances, despite allowing a walk and a single.

Jace Peterson and Eduardo Escobar also had solo homers for Milwaukee, which clinched a postseason berth thanks to losses by the San Diego Padres and the Cincinnati Reds on Saturday.

Diamondbacks 6, Astros 4 (10 innings)

Daulton Varsho slugged a two-run home run in the 10th inning and visiting Arizona squared its interleague series against Houston.

Varsho’s blast followed an RBI single by Kole Calhoun that snapped a 3-3 tie. Varsho’s 11th home run, a two-run shot off Astros right-hander Yimi Garcia (3-9), carried 431 feet to center field.

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Tyler Clippard allowed an RBI single to Jason Castro in the bottom of the 10th, but Arizona improved to 6-10 in extra-inning games by winning on the road for just the 20th time in 2021.

Phillies 5, Mets 3

Jean Segura belted two home runs, Bryce Harper hit a two-run double in the seventh inning, and visiting Philadelphia continued its surge with a victory over New York.

The Phillies won for the fifth time in seven games and beat the Mets for the fifth consecutive time. They moved to within one game of the Atlanta Braves in the NL East, thanks to Atlanta’s loss to the Giants in San Francisco later Saturday.

Philadelphia right-hander Aaron Nola (8-8) allowed one run and four hits in 5 2/3 innings for his first win since July 25. He struck out nine, walked one on 96 pitches and improved to 9-3 lifetime against the Mets.

A’s 3, Angels 1

James Kaprielian allowed two hits over six shutout innings to lead Oakland to a victory over Los Angeles in Anaheim, Calif.

He retired the first six batters of the game until Jose Rojas singled to lead off the third. But Kaprielian responded by retiring the next 10 Angels hitters in a row until Jack Mayfield doubled with one out in the sixth.

Kaprielian (8-5) got out of the inning and was finished after six, having made 90 pitches, striking out five and walking nobody.

–Field Level Media

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MLB roundup: Giants earn wild 11-inning win over Braves

Sep 6, 2021; Denver, Colorado, USA; San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Kevin Gausman (34) pitches in the first inning against the Colorado Rockies at Coors Field. Mandatory Credit: Isaiah J. Downing-USA TODAY Sports

September 18, 2021

Kevin Gausman, pinch-hitting because San Francisco had run out of position players on the bench, lifted a walk-off sacrifice fly in the 11th inning Friday night as the Giants outlasted the visiting Atlanta Braves 6-5.

The matchup of division leaders saw both teams hit game-extending home runs in the ninth. Travis d’Arnaud socked a three-run shot in the top of the inning to put Atlanta ahead 5-4, and pinch hitter Donovan Solano belted a solo shot with two outs and two strikes to tie the game.

The Giants snapped a two-game losing streak and extended their lead over the second-place Los Angeles Dodgers to two games in the National League West.

The Braves took a third straight defeat and lost a game off their advantage in the NL East. They lead the Philadelphia Phillies by just two games.

Rays 7, Tigers 4 (10 innings)

Brett Phillips blasted a three-run homer in the bottom of the 10th and Tampa Bay rallied from a three-run deficit in the ninth to pull out the win over Detroit in St. Petersburg, Fla.

Phillips’ homer came after Bryan Garcia (2-2) walked leadoff batter Taylor Walls. Andrew Kittredge (9-3) held the Tigers scoreless in the top of the inning and collected the victory.

Tampa Bay’s Yandy Diaz had a two-run, pinch-hit single in the ninth. Miguel Cabrera had two hits for the Tigers.

Cardinals 8, Padres 2

Dylan Carlson hit two homers, a solo shot from the left side and a grand slam batting right-handed, and drove in five runs to propel host St. Louis past San Diego for its sixth consecutive victory.

Tyler O’Neill added a two-run homer for the Cardinals, who moved 1 1/2 games up on the Padres in the race for the second National League wild-card slot. The Reds also won, so Cincinnati remains one game back of St. Louis. San Diego has lost six of its past eight games.

Cardinals starter Miles Mikolas (1-2) blanked the Padres on three hits through 5 2/3 innings. Padres starter Vince Velasquez (3-7) allowed four runs on four hits in four innings.

Phillies 4, Mets 3

Zack Wheeler won his fourth straight start as Philadelphia edged host New York.

Didi Gregorius’ two-out RBI double in the eighth inning proved to be the difference for the Phillies, who earned their third straight win.

Wheeler (14-9) allowed one run on four hits and one walk while striking out six over five innings — the first time he’s lasted fewer than six innings since July 7.

Twins 7, Blue Jays 3

Jorge Polanco hit a two-run home run, Josh Donaldson, Miguel Sano and Brent Rooker added solo shots and visiting Minnesota defeated Toronto.

Rooker also had an RBI double for the Twins in the first meeting between the teams this season. Twins right-hander Michael Pineda (7-8) allowed three runs (one earned), three hits and two walks in 5 2/3 innings.

Vladimir Guerrero Jr. hit his 46th home run of the season for the Blue Jays, who are a half-game behind the Yankees for the American League’s second wild-card spot. Toronto’s Hyun Jin Ryu (13-9) allowed five runs, five hits and a walk in two-plus innings.

Reds 3, Dodgers 1

Kyle Farmer delivered twice in key situations and Luis Castillo threw 6 1/3 shutout innings as Cincinnati beat visiting Los Angeles.

Farmer doubled twice, including a two-run two-bagger in the sixth that provided valuable insurance for the Reds, who won consecutive games for the first time since Aug. 26-27. Castillo (8-15) struck out 10 over a season-high 111 pitches.

The Dodgers had their six-game win streak snapped. Walker Buehler (14-4) went six innings, giving up three runs and six hits while striking out five against two walks.

Yankees 8, Indians 0

Joey Gallo homered twice, Corey Kluber pitched six scoreless innings in his best start since coming off the injured list and host New York rolled past Cleveland.

The Yankees won for the fourth time in five games. Aaron Judge and Giancarlo Stanton added solo homers while Brett Gardner hit a three-run homer for New York.

Gallo finished with three hits while teammates Judge and Gio Urshela had two apiece. The Indians managed only four hits, all singles.

Red Sox 7, Orioles 1

Bobby Dalbec homered to back an efficient Chris Sale in his return from COVID-19, and Boston thumped visiting Baltimore.

Hunter Renfroe blew the contest open with a three-game double in the sixth inning as the Red Sox won their third straight.

Austin Hays hit a solo shot for the Orioles, who sealed their third 100-loss season in the last four years.

Brewers 8, Cubs 5

Kolten Wong lined a two-run, tiebreaking single during a four-run eighth inning as Milwaukee rallied for a victory over visiting Chicago.

Lorenzo Cain hit a tying single earlier in the inning as the Brewers defeated the Cubs for the 10th straight time. Luis Urias drove in three runs for Milwaukee, and Wong had three of the club’s nine hits.

Aaron Ashby (3-0) struck out five and gave up three hits in three scoreless innings of relief for the win. Josh Hader worked the ninth for his 32nd save in 33 opportunities. Frank Schwindel homered for the Cubs, who have lost three straight games and six of their past seven.

Athletics 5, Angels 4

Oakland rallied from an early deficit and beat Los Angeles in Anaheim, Calif., with the winning run scoring on a passed ball.

Angels catcher Kurt Suzuki, who played for the A’s from 2007-11 and parts of both 2012 and 2013, homered in the game, but he also committed two passed balls in the sixth inning, including one that allowed Mark Canha to score from third.

Oakland is 2 1/2 games behind the Yankees for the second AL wild card. A’s starter Cole Irvin (10-13) got the win after throwing six innings. He allowed four runs, but only one was earned.

Rockies 9, Nationals 8

Elias Diaz homered as part of a two-run ninth inning and visiting Colorado rallied past Washington for its fourth straight win.

Diaz led off the ninth against Kyle Finnegan (5-8) and lined a homer to left. Sam Hilliard singled and Finnegan walked Raimel Tapia. Garrett Hampson bunted the runners over and Brendan Rodgers looped a single to left, scoring Hilliard with the go-ahead run.

Rodgers and Hilliard also homered for the Rockies, who rallied from an early 6-2 deficit. Lane Thomas had a three-run homer and Keibert Ruiz had three hits for Washington.

Astros 4, Diamondbacks 3 (10 innings)

Chas McCormick earned a walk-off RBI when he was hit by a 10th-inning pitch, and Houston rallied for an unorthodox win over visiting Arizona.

After Arizona moved ahead on a David Peralta RBI single in the top of the 10th, Houston responded with a Jake Meyers bloop single that tied the game. Later with the bases loaded, Arizona reliever Tyler Clippard (1-1) plunked McCormick in the first walk-off hit by pitch for Houston since Aug. 8, 1998.

Diamondbacks left-hander Madison Bumgarner took a no-hitter into the sixth inning, giving up a two-run homer to Jose Altuve. It was the lone hit surrendered by Bumgarner over seven innings. Kole Calhoun, fresh off the 10-day injured list, hit his fourth home run for Arizona.

Mariners 6, Royals 2

Jarred Kelenic hit a pair of two-run home runs as Seattle defeated host Kansas City in the opening game of a three-game series.

Chris Flexen (12-6) worked 5 2/3 strong innings for the Mariners. He allowed one run on six hits, with two walks and three strikeouts.

The Mariners spoiled the major league debut of Royals pitcher Jon Heasley (0-1). The 24-year-old right-hander allowed four runs, all coming on home runs by Kelenic, on six hits in four innings. Hunter Dozier added a homer for Kansas City.

White Sox 8, Rangers 0

Luis Robert went 3-for-5 with a double and three RBIs, Dylan Cease struck out 10 batters over five scoreless innings, and Chicago cruised over host Texas in Arlington, Texas.

Jose Abreu added a double and two RBIs for Chicago, which snapped a two-game skid. Romy Gonzalez, Eloy Jimenez and Cesar Hernandez also drove in one run apiece. Cease (12-7) kept Rangers hitters off balance throughout most of the night, scattering four hits and a pair of walks.

Leody Taveras went 2-for-5 and swiped a base for Texas, which has lost three in a row and four of five. The Rangers did not record an extra-base hit.

Pirates 2, Marlins 1

Cole Tucker lofted the go-ahead sacrifice fly in the sixth, leading Pittsburgh past host Miami.

Pittsburgh closer Chris Stratton allowed a leadoff triple to Bryan De La Cruz in the ninth but escaped the jam to earn his sixth save of the year. The last-place Pirates are one win away from clinching their fourth straight series, and they have won seven of their past 10 games.

Pittsburgh starter Wil Crowe (4-7) earned his first win since July 30, allowing three hits, one walk and one run in five innings. Elieser Hernandez (1-2) took the loss, allowing four hits, a career-high five walks and two runs (none earned).

-Field Level Media





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A Roundup of Recent Federal Court Decisions – Reason.com

Please enjoy the latest edition of Short Circuit, a weekly feature from the Institute for Justice.

After a fatal police shooting in Maine in 2017, Joshua Gray criticized the officers’ conduct on social media. Which officials did not like, and so when Joshua applied for a license to expand his private investigator business into the state, they turned him down, citing his lack of “good moral character.” A First Amendment violation? Maine’s highest court didn’t think so. So now Joshua and IJ are asking the U.S. Supreme Court to hear his case and decide whether the gov’t can silence its critics by denying them the right to work in the occupation of their choice. Click here to read the cert petition.

  • If you’re in a national park in Maine and you drive a car into a tree at high speed with three passengers (who all die as a result) in the middle of the night, and the police have limited personnel, have to deal with the bodies and your own injuries, have no equipment on hand to draft an affidavit, and their attorney doesn’t at first call them back, are these exigent circumstances that justify a warrantless blood draw to see if you had too much hooch? District Court: No. First Circuit: Yes. Dubitante opinion: I would have remanded for fact-finding on BAC dissipation.
  • Nonprofit groups challenge Rhode Island disclosure laws for political advertising, including a requirement that ads list the names of the group’s five largest donors, alleging a variety of First Amendment theories. First Circuit: Whatever rules might apply to other areas of speech, the Supreme Court has been pretty clear that campaign finance disclosure is constitutional. And now for this week’s Judge Selya Vocab Quiz: velivolant, ipse dixit, pellucid, remonstrance, pretermit.
  • Allegation: Rikers Island inmate develops large, painful gum abscess that interferes with talking, eating, and sleeping. Officials ignore numerous increasingly urgent requests for appropriate treatment. Indeed, he needs surgery, but he’s offered only a teeth cleaning and a tooth pulling. Second Circuit (over a dissent): Which would not violate the Eighth Amendment. Case dismissed.
  • Ashley Borough, Penn. police officer gives women a choice between getting arrested or giving him oral sex. He gets 15-year sentence after pleading guilty to violating their civil rights under color of law. Third Circuit: Which isn’t a sex offense, so the district court can’t order him to register as a sex offender.
  • Is the National Security Agency unconstitutionally spying on Wikimedia’s internet communications? Fourth Circuit: It’s a secret. Case dismissed.
  • Man takes Shreveport, La. officers on low-speed chase. He briefly exits his pickup, rifles around in the back, and tries to re-enter (allegedly visibly empty-handed). An officer (allegedly without warning) shoots him four times. He survives. Fifth Circuit (laudably including a link to the video): We can only review the law, not the facts, and there are too many factual disputes. No qualified immunity for now. (Also, no Heck bar.)
  • Can the feds prioritize which illegal immigrants to investigate and deport—say, those who commit certain kinds of crimes over those who are more law abiding? Louisiana officials, Texas officials, and a district court judge: Absolutely not! Congress must authorize any prioritizing. Fifth Circuit: Well, actually, the “who to charge” decision is generally shielded from judicial review and committed to the gov’t’s discretion, so we will stay at least that part of the district court’s nationwide injunction. Also, it seems a little strange that the nationwide injunction applies in the Ninth and Eleventh Circuits even though courts in those circuits rejected similar challenges—but we’ll leave it at that.
  • Would-be busker wants to perform in Houston, but it’s illegal for him to do so in his preferred areas. District court: He hasn’t been arrested, cited, or threatened with either. He doesn’t have standing to sue. Fifth Circuit: Something like 40 years of precedent say otherwise. The case can proceed.
  • Noncitizen victims of serious crimes (and qualifying family members) who cooperate with law enforcement are eligible for special visas, but the feds tend to take an absurdly long time processing the applications (and even the work authorization applications that would let visa applicants work in the meantime). Some applicants sue. Sixth Circuit: Their complaint at least plausibly alleges the sort of unreasonable delay the Administrative Procedure Act forbids. The cases may proceed.
  • For over 935 weeks in a row, anti-Israel protesters have picketed services at a synagogue in Ann Arbor, Mich., holding signs with such inflammatory messages as “Jewish Power Corrupts” and “End the Palestinian Holocaust.” Two members of the congregation sue, raising a variety of constitutional claims. Sixth Circuit: None of which can overcome the robust protection afforded by the First Amendment.
  • Last year, Tennessee passed a law prohibiting physicians from performing abortions at specified “gestational ages,” all of them pre-viability (at “fetal heartbeat,” at six weeks, at eight weeks, etc.). The law also criminalizes a physician’s performing an abortion if the physician “knows” that the abortion is “because of” race, sex, or Down syndrome diagnosis. District court: Preliminary injunction entered. Sixth Circuit: Affirmed. The pre-viability restriction conflicts with Supreme Court precedent, and the sex-race-Down-syndrome provision is unconstitutionally vague. Partial concurrence in the judgment: I agree that Supreme Court precedent invalidates the first bit, but that precedent is unpersuasive. And the second bit isn’t vague.
  • Much like the Second Circuit, the Seventh Circuit isn’t all that concerned about strip clubs’ being excluded from federal COVID relief funding.
  • After the Supreme Court ruled that life sentences without possibility of parole for crimes committed under the age of 18 are unconstitutional, Missouri officials began to offer that possibility. Eighth Circuit (over a dissent): But the state’s new policies and practices are constitutionally deficient. For instance, inmates are allowed one delegate at parole hearings, and the delegate is not permitted to speak about a range of subjects (like an inmate’s efforts at rehabilitation) that the parole board must consider when making its decision. Victims and law enforcement, on the other hand, can speak with no limitations on subject matter.
  • Was Rep. Devin Nunes defamed when Heart Publications published an article claiming he was involved in a conspiracy to cover up undocumented laborers at his family’s dairy farm? Eighth Circuit: He at least survives a motion to dismiss. But we decline his invitation to revisit New York Times v. Sullivan, since we can’t actually do that.
  • Upset by a business deal gone bad, two Australian citizens start an international campaign to inform the public about their side of the story, sending hundreds of emails to employees of their former business associate and even hiring vans to drive around L.A. displaying messages criticizing him. The business associate sues the men for stalking and wins $2.2 mil in damages. Ninth Circuit: But all of their activity was protected by the First Amendment, so no dice. Dissent: The First Amendment doesn’t protect foreigners outside the United States.
  • A recent California law imposes civil and criminal penalties on employers lest they compel unwilling employees to agree to arbitration as a condition of employment. Is the law preempted by the Federal Arbitration Act? The Ninth Circuit says no, but the penalties are no good. Dissent: C’mon, this is just so Ninth Circuit of you guys.
  • Earlier this year, California’s governor issued an executive order imposing a moratorium on the death penalty. Does that moot a long-running suit over successive iterations of the state’s lethal injection protocols? Ninth Circuit: Not at all. There’s nothing stopping him or a future governor from rescinding the order. Separately, district attorneys from three counties can’t intervene in the suit. Dissent: The DAs are trying to restore the death penalty (pursuant to a 2016 proposition passed by voters), and the California attorney general is not. They should be allowed to intervene.
  • Sacramento, Calif. inmate experiences morphine withdrawal after staff cut him off cold turkey—which they did after discovering he was hoarding his meds instead of ingesting all of them. Eighth Amendment violation? Ninth Circuit: Might could be. Prison policy requires staff watch inmates ingest morphine when dispensed, and there’s no deference for officials not following policy. New trial.
  • The U.S. Forest Service obtained an easement in 1962 for a logging road across two private properties neighboring Montana’s Bitterroot National Forest. Nearly half a century later, the Forest Service announced the road provided public access to the forest, leading to traffic hazards and trespassing. The neighbors sue to confirm that the easement doesn’t allow public access. Ninth Circuit: Alas, the Quiet Title Act’s statute of limitations is jurisdictional, and the case was brought too late.
  • Transgender English professor seeks tenure but is denied under suspicious circumstances. She sues, alleging violations of Title VII, seeking compensation and reinstatement with tenure. Tenth Circuit: While this appeal was pending, the Supreme Court ruled in Bostock v. Clayton County that discrimination based on gender identity violates Title VII, which makes this case a lot easier.
  • Eleventh Circuit (1985): It violates the Eighth Amendment for corrections officers to leave an inmate with a bleeding wound sitting around for two hours before getting him medical attention. Eleventh Circuit: (2021): That case was about a head wound that left a pool of blood. But this case is about a cut to the hand that left a “path of blood” as the officer escorted the plaintiff to a holding cell. Qualified immunity. Concurrence: He sued the officer who walked with him for a few minutes but not the officers he was handed off to, who were the ones who left him for hours.

There are more than 20,500 federal law enforcement officers in Texas, Mississippi, and Louisiana, and, thanks to some recent decisions in the Fifth Circuit, nary a one of them can be sued for violating the Constitution. Apart from just being straight-up terrifying (the cases involve federal police beating people up and trying to shoot them for no reason), this de facto absolute immunity for federal officers is a radical departure from history. That’s why Professor Peter Schuck, who literally wrote the book on constitutional accountability, Professor Seth Stoughton, a former police officer, and a cross-ideological group of public policy organizations have all filed amicus briefs urging the Supreme Court to take up Byrd v. Lamb, an IJ case, and ensure that victims of unconstitutional misconduct by federal officers have a legal remedy. Click here to read the briefs. Click here to watch IJ client Kevin Byrd tell his story.



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NFL injury roundup: Niners CB Jason Verrett fears another torn ACL

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One of the unluckiest players in the NFL when it comes to staying healthy appears to have suffered another season-ending injury in Week 1 of the NFL season.

San Francisco 49ers cornerback Jason Verrett suffered a right knee injury that both the player and team fear could be a torn ACL, according to multiple reports. Verrett is expected to have the injury examined further when the Niners arrive in West Virginia for a week of practices before next week’s contest in Philadelphia.

“We’re hoping for the best, but it’s crushing,” Niners head coach Kyle Shanahan told reporters after his team’s 41-33 victory over the Detroit Lions. “The bad luck he’s had and putting together these last two years staying healthy and how good of a camp he had. … I have got a lot of love for JV and respect him as much as anyone I’ve ever been around. So, I’m really hurting for him.”

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Selected in the first round of the 2014 draft by the Chargers, Verrett played a total of just six games from 2016 to 2019 due to a torn left ACL in 2016 that never fully healed, followed by a torn right Achilles suffered during a training camp conditioning test while with the Chargers in 2018.

Finally healthy, Verrett, 30, signed with San Francisco before the 2019 season.

With Verrett likely out, the Niners could turn to a familiar face for much-needed depth — veteran free agent cornerback Richard Sherman.

“We have discussed it,” Shanahan told reporters. “I’ve talked to Sherm about it, too. Sherm is always a possibility.”

San Francisco also lost another player due to injury in running back Raheem Mostert, who left with a knee injury and did not return.

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Denver Broncos

Receiver Jerry Jeudy suffered a right high ankle sprain and was carted off the field during the third quarter of his team’s 27-13 road victory over the New York Giants. According to reports, X-rays were negative for Jeudy’s injury.

Washington Football Team

Quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick will have an MRI on Monday to determine the full extent of a hip injury he suffered during the second quarter of his team’s 20-16 loss to the Los Angeles Chargers. Fitzpatrick had to leave the game and did not return.

Los Angeles Chargers

Right tackle Bryan Bulaga (back) and cornerback Nasir Adderley (shoulder) suffered injuries in the game against the Washington Football Club that forced them off the field. Neither player returned to the game.

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New York Jets

Left tackle Mekhi Becton suffered what is believed to be an MCL knee sprain during the third quarter of his team’s loss to the Carolina Panthers. Becton was helped to the sideline by trainers and carted to the locker room for further evaluation.

New Orleans Saints

Cornerback Marshon Lattimore, who reportedly agreed to a five-year, $97.6 million extension over the weekend, suffered a right thumb injury that forced him to miss some time in the second half of his team’s 38-3 victory over the Green Bay Packers. Lattimore returned to the game with a cast on his hand and will reportedly be week-to-week as he recovers.

Seattle Seahawks

Oft-injured running back Rashaad Penny suffered a left calf injury early in his team’s 28-16 victory over the Indianapolis Colts the forced the San Diego State product to leave the game. Penny did not return.

–Field Level Media



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A Roundup of Recent Federal Court Decisions – Reason.com

Please enjoy the latest edition of Short Circuit, a weekly feature from the Institute for Justice.

Friends, qualified immunity is no picnic. But in a series of recent decisions federal courts have upped the ante, bestowing a de facto absolute immunity on federal officers who (1) put an innocent teenager in prison for about two years on completely made-up evidence, (2) tried to shoot a man in the face in a fit of pique, (3) beat up an unresisting Vietnam vet for no discernible reason, and (4) beat up unresisting people who were protesting police brutality. That’s all on the latest episode of the Bound By Oath podcast. New to the podcast? Start with Episode 1.

  • A warrantless drug-doggie sniff outside your home might be a Fourth Amendment violation. So, too, might a sniff outside your apartment. But outside your commercial storage unit? Decidedly not, says the Second Circuit.
  • In a rare “mini en banc” opinion, a three-judge panel of the Second Circuit clarifies/overrules some old circuit precedent on entrapment after giving a heads-up to the other circuit judges. All of which means a new trial for this Dominican immigrant who was busted after selling fentanyl to his barber, who was secretly a confidential informant for the DEA in exchange for cash and deportation deferrals.
  • Man is convicted of a drug crime, and the feds move to deport him under a statute that allows the removal of “aliens” convicted of such crimes. But wait! He was a naturalized citizen at the time of his conviction, making him not an “alien” under the statute. Feds: No matter, we also stripped him of his citizenship because he lied on his immigration papers. Third Circuit: Nope, removal of citizenship is not retroactive. He was a citizen at the time of the crime, so he cannot be deported under the chosen statute. Concurrence: Maybe under another one, though.
  • Cameroonian man—a speaker of “Pidgin English”—enters the Escherian world of immigrant-removal proceedings. Despite many clues that the man is not fluent in Standard English, the immigration judge proceeds with several removal hearings and denies the man’s asylum application. Third Circuit: The Due Process Clause (yes, yes, of the Fifth Amendment, not the Fourteenth) entitles the man to an opportunity to make arguments and present evidence on his own behalf. And the immigration judge’s failure to inquire into his need for an interpreter violated that right. He gets a new hearing.
  • Highly paid, salaried employees with executive, administrative, or professional duties are generally excepted from federal law requiring employers to pay time and a half for overtime hours. So an oil-and-gas company need not pay overtime to a supervisor earning over $200k/yr, right? Fifth Circuit (sitting en banc, over a pair of dissents): Nope, pay the man. He’s paid a daily rate that doesn’t meet the relevant definition of a salary.
  • In 2016, the en banc Fifth Circuit struck down Texas’s voter ID law. Are the plaintiffs in that case “prevailing parties” entitled to attorneys’ fees? Fifth Circuit (opinion by Judge Ho): I mean, obviously. Concurrence (also by Judge Ho): But let me reiterate why they should have lost.
  • The 12th Man tradition at Texas A&M stems from an incident in 1922 when, facing a stronger team and with a bench thinned by injuries, the Aggies’ coach called former player E. King Gill down from the stands to suit up and stand ready to substitute in. The Aggies won, and though Gill was never called in, his readiness to serve his fellow Aggies stands as an inspirational example to this day. Fifth Circuit: In a less inspirational example, Texas A&M, which straight-up stole a biography of Gill from its copyright owner, is entitled to sovereign immunity.
  • Allegation: Texas prison guards beat up inmate who asked them to lower “scalding hot” shower temperature. There’s no video or witnesses, just the inmate’s word (plus medical records of his injuries) against the guards. District court: Which isn’t enough to get the case in front of jury. Fifth Circuit: Reversed. And since it’s clearly established guards can’t use gratuitous force on inmates, no qualified immunity.
  • Article III standing helps ensure that federal courts don’t issue advisory opinions, observes the Sixth Circuit, before devoting seven pages to dicta about the associational-standing doctrine. Concurrence: Those seven pages are unnecessary to resolving the controversy before us—whether the Association of American Physicians & Surgeons has standing to sue the FDA over its early-COVID regulation of the federal gov’t’s stockpile of hydroxychloroquine. (It doesn’t.)
  • The Sixth Circuit takes a philosophical dive into the nature of severance: Is it a remedy to fix unconstitutional statutes? Or, because unconstitutional enactments are void ab initio, is it simply a recognition of what the law has always been? Three judges say the latter, which means that an energy company that made prohibited robocalls is still on the hook, even though it made those calls during a five-year period when the federal robocall statute contained an exemption the Supreme Court later held unconstitutional.
  • Was a motorist actively resisting a Kenosha, Wisc. officer when the officer tased him? You be the judge! (Skip to about :30 seconds in.) Seventh Circuit: Also, a jury should judge. No qualified immunity.
  • Among myriad abortion requirements, Indiana prohibits non-doctors from performing medication abortions, requires second-trimester abortions to be performed in a hospital or surgical center, and bans telemedicine in abortion care. District court: Improvements in medicine and technology place these laws outside the existing precedents okaying them. Seventh Circuit: It’s not for the district court to modify higher-court precedent. Indiana officials may continue to enforce these laws while this case proceeds. Dissent: The Supreme Court hasn’t overruled Roe v. Wade yet.
  • Police visit home of Hot Springs, Ark. homeschooling family after 16-year-old accuses his parents of neglect, abuse. The parents’ seven minor children are removed from the home for several months, and it takes 21 months to resolve the charges against the parents. Who sue. Eighth Circuit (2018): Taking the parents’ allegations as true, their lawsuit against at least one of the child-abuse investigators can proceed. District court (2020): On the summary-judgment record, all the remaining defendants are entitled to qualified immunity. Eighth Circuit (2021): Affirmed.
  • Have you been lying awake at night wondering why Congress included § 1158(a)(2)(D) of the Immigration and Nationality Act as a subsection of § 1158(a)(2) instead of as a free-standing section? The Ninth Circuit has you covered.
  • While appealing his conviction, California man is required to complete a sex-offender treatment program as a condition of supervised release. Uh oh! Part of the treatment program is admitting his offense! He refuses to do so, is kicked out of the program, and is incarcerated. He sues, alleging a violation of his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination. Ninth Circuit: The Fifth Amendment protects against the use of self-incriminating testimony in criminal proceedings. That hasn’t happened yet, so there’s no violation. Dissent: Dude’s in jail because he wouldn’t admit to a crime. Sounds like a Fifth Amendment problem to me.
  • Now-paroled Colorado inmate suffering from extreme case of ulcerative colitis (that forces him to use the bathroom nearly 30 times per day) missed hundreds of meals per year rather than risk soiling himself at the dining hall. Inmate: If officials had renewed my “movement pass” to let me skip the chow line, I could have eaten and gotten back to my cell (and bathroom) in time. Instead, they just offered adult diapers—that is, a choice between skipping meals or eating while sitting in my own feces. Tenth Circuit: A reasonable jury could find a violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act. But not the Eighth Amendment.
  • Teen takes car without permission, crashes after high-speed police chase. When a Columbus, Ga. officer (who’s on foot) sees the car’s reverse lights turn on, he begins to fire 11 rounds into the car, continuing as it slowly reverses past him. The car comes to a stop, and, as a passenger begs the officer for help, he walks directly in front of the car, reloads, and fires another 10 rounds. (The driver is killed. Two passengers, also teens, survive; one is shot in the face and the other in the shoulder and arm.) District court: The officer is entitled to qualified immunity for the first barrage, but not the second. Eleventh Circuit: QI for both. Dissent: QI for neither.
  • After a Little Rock, Ark. officer shoots and kills a motorist, the police chief fires him for violating department policy requiring officers not to place themselves in the path of an oncoming vehicle. State trial court: Let’s make that a 30-day suspension. State appeals court: Take another look. The question isn’t whether the officer behaved reasonably, it’s whether he violated the policy. (We had occasion to discuss Little Rock officers’ tendency to shoot motorists on a recent episode of Bound By Oath.)

In May 2019, Harris County, Tex. officers took over $42k in cash that couple Ameal Woods and Jordan Davis had scrimped and saved for years, and which Ameal was traveling with to buy a used tractor-trailer for their business. He wasn’t arrested, charged with a crime, or even given as much as a warning. Later, officials filed a forfeiture action with boilerplate, copy-pasted language written by an officer who was not at the scene (a review of hundreds of cases over the past five years reveals that this is a common practice). But now Ameal and Jordan are taking the fight to Harris County. Represented by the Institute for Justice, they have filed a class action under the Texas Constitution challenging the county’s system of policing for profit. Click here to learn more.



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MLB roundup: Rockies stun Phillies with three-run ninth

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Pinch hitter Ryan McMahon belted a two-run home run off Ian Kennedy with two outs in the ninth inning to lift the Colorado Rockies past the host Philadelphia Phillies 4-3 on Thursday.

Sam Hilliard then went back-to-back off Kennedy with a mammoth homer to cap a three-run ninth.

Kennedy (1-1) retired the first two batters in the inning before Colton Welker singled. Kennedy jumped to an 0-2 count on McMahon, who fouled off the next two pitches before connecting on an 80 mph knuckle-curve and sending it out to right field.

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Yonathan Daza and Welker had two hits each for the Rockies, who snapped a four-game losing streak. The hits were the first in the majors for Welker.

Bryce Harper homered and singled for the Phillies.

Philadelphia starter Ranger Suarez tossed six strong innings, allowing five hits and one run with six strikeouts and one walk.

Blue Jays 6, Yankees 4

Vladimir Guerrero Jr. hit his 42nd homer and Bo Bichette hit a tiebreaking single with two outs in the seventh inning as Toronto pushed its winning streak to eight games and completed a four-game sweep of slumping New York at Yankee Stadium.

Randal Grichuk also homered as Toronto moved within a half-game of the Yankees for the AL’s second wild-card spot.

Anthony Rizzo hit a game-tying two-run homer in the sixth. Gary Sanchez and pinch hitter Luke Voit homered in the ninth, but the Yankees set a season high with their sixth straight loss.

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Braves 7, Nationals 6 (10 innings)

Joc Pederson’s RBI single drove in the winning run with two outs in the 10th inning, giving Atlanta a walk-off win over visiting Washington.

Pederson delivered a sharp single to left against Wander Suero (2-3), who had loaded the bases. The winning pitcher was Jacob Webb (3-2), who tossed a scoreless top of the 10th.

The game featured a wild finish. Luis Garcia hit a 448-foot homer in the eighth to give the Nationals a 5-4 lead, but the Braves answered with solo shots from Freddie Freeman and Adam Duvall in the bottom of the eighth to take a 6-5 advantage. Washington tied the game in the ninth against Atlanta closer Will Smith.

Indians 4, Twins 1

Cal Quantrill allowed one run over a career-high 7 2/3 innings as host Cleveland ended Minnesota’s four-game winning streak.

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Franmil Reyes belted his career-best 28th homer and Oscar Mercado and Jose Ramirez each launched a solo shot for the Indians, who salvaged the finale of their four-game series. The win was just Cleveland’s second in seven contests.

Quantrill (5-3) overcame Miguel Sano’s 26th homer of the season and second in as many games to allow just three other hits while striking out five batters.

A’s 3, White Sox 1

Sean Manaea allowed one run in seven innings as Oakland beat visiting Chicago in the rubber match of a three-game series.

Manaea (9-9) struck out nine, walked one and yielded five hits. Sergio Romo tossed a scoreless eighth inning, and Andrew Chafin handled the ninth for his third save.

An errant pickoff throw broke a third-inning tie, handing the decisive run to the A’s. White Sox starter Reynaldo Lopez (3-2) gave up three runs, only one earned, in five innings.

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Cardinals 2, Dodgers 1

Tyler O’Neill hit the decisive homer in the fifth inning as St. Louis edged visiting to gain a split of the teams’ four-game series.

Cardinals starter Jake Woodford allowed one run on three hits and two walks in four innings. Alex Reyes (6-8) followed with two scoreless innings. T.J. McFarland and Luis Garcia teamed to get the game into the ninth inning, and Giovanny Gallegos retired three consecutive batters for his sixth save.

Phil Bickford (3-2), the third Dodgers pitcher, allowed O’Neill’s homer.

Marlins 3, Mets 2

Jazz Chisholm slugged a tiebreaking solo homer in the eighth inning, leading Miami over visiting New York.

The Mets led 2-0 until the sixth inning, when Chisholm picked up an RBI fielder’s choice grounder. His homer in the eighth was measured at 402 feet, and it was the rookie’s 15th long ball of the season.

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Richard Bleier (3-2) earned the win. Dylan Floro picked up his ninth save for the Marlins.

Royals 6, Orioles 0

Nicky Lopez had a home run and an RBI single for the first two runs as Kansas City defeated host Baltimore to earn a split of the teams’ four-game series.

Carlos Hernandez (6-1) allowed just three hits with six scoreless innings for the win. He struck out one and walked three. Domingo Tapia (two innings) and Scott Barlow (one innings) completed the three-hit shutout. Hunter Dozier also homered for Kansas City.

Orioles starter John Means (5-7) gave up two runs (one scored after he left the game) on five hits in seven-plus innings.

–Field Level Media

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Economic development roundup: $19M investment to bring nearly 200 jobs to North Carolina

Vitamin and dietary supplements manufacturer Nature’s Value will invest more than $19 million to expand into Winston-Salem, North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper’s office said.

The investment is expected to create 183 jobs in Forsyth County, with the average annual salary for new positions being $57,669. Cooper’s office said the annual payroll impact would be more than $10.5 million per year.

“This expansion project will help us to be more competitive and allow us to be more accessible to our main customers, while creating employment and economic prospects for the talented North Carolina working community,” Nature Value CEO Oscar Ramjeet said. “We look forward to the opportunities that this expansion project will bring.”

Nature’s Value will receive a Job Development Investment Grant (JDIG) over a 12-year term. Based on new tax revenues generated by new jobs, the JDIG agreement authorizes reimbursement to Nature’s Value up to $1.95 million. The project is estimated to grow the state’s economy by more than $780 million, Cooper’s office said.

Grupporeco: The household appliance components manufacturer will invest $28 million to build its first dishwasher components manufacturing facility in Kinston. The investment is expected to create 110 jobs in Lenoir County. Grupporeco will receive a JDIG over a 12-year term. Based on new tax revenues generated by new jobs, the JDIG agreement authorizes reimbursement to Grupporeco up to $918,000.

Crump Group: The pet treats manufacturer will invest $13.2 million to build its first U.S. production facility in Nashville. The investment is expected to create 160 jobs in Nash County. Crump Group will receive a JDIG over a 12-year term. Based on new tax revenues generated by new jobs, the JDIG agreement authorizes reimbursement to Grupporeco up to $1.64 million.

Harger: The electrical equipment manufacturer will invest $3.2 million to expand operations in Fairmont. The investment is expected to create 20 jobs in Robeson County. Harger will receive a performance-based One North Carolina Fund grant of $75,000 to help with the expansion if it meets job creation and capital investment targets. All One NC grants require a matching grant from local governments.





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A Roundup of Recent Federal Court Decisions – Reason.com

Please enjoy the latest edition of Short Circuit, a weekly feature from the Institute for Justice.

Many of the opinions we summarize on Short Circuit reference the “Will of the People.” Judges are like “who am I to find a law unconstitutional? That would overrule the Will of the People.” But what exactly is this “Will” anyway? Do “the People” even know about most laws, let alone “will” them? We at the Center for Judicial Engagement are trying to answer these questions with a conference on Friday, September 10, featuring a slew of top-notch scholars. If you’re in the Washington, DC area we’d love to have you come and join in! Register here. There’s free Virginia CLE.

  • Did U.S. intelligence have advance knowledge of a credible threat to Saudi journalist and Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi, whose murder was—to a high degree of confidence—ordered by the Saudi Crown Prince? That’s not the sort of thing you can find out via a public records request, says the D.C. Circuit.
  • Allegation: Tenants tell Biddeford, Maine police officer that their landlord just threatened to murder them and shows the officer video of the landlord screaming at them. The landlord then screams at the officer that he has “nothing to lose,” that he’ll be “in the newspaper tomorrow,” and that he’ll make a “bloody mess.” The officer leaves. Minutes later, the landlord shoots the tenants, killing two of them. First Circuit (over a dissent): The officer and the city might be liable.
  • Private Massachusetts high school receives three unsolicited one-page faxes from the nonprofit that administers the ACT. As one does in such situations, the school files a class action seeking $400 mil in damages under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act of 1991, which drags on for eight years. First Circuit: The case can’t go forward as a class, but the school’s individual claims can go forward. The nonprofit’s offer to settle for the school’s requested individual damages of $46.5k did not moot the case, because the school didn’t accept the offer.
  • Seven months after being arrested by New York City police for alleged drug violations, man successfully has the prosecution dismissed on speedy-trial grounds. He then sues for malicious prosecution. But wait! He can’t sue unless the criminal prosecution had a “favorable termination.” Does dismissal on speedy-trial grounds count? Second Circuit: If the state doesn’t prosecute your case, it’s probably safe to assume it wasn’t a very good case, which sounds like a favorable outcome to us.
  • Can a transgender woman who claims she was stabbed and raped by a fellow inmate sue federal prison officials who allegedly ignored her concerns? Third Circuit: “Her case falls comfortably within one of the few contexts in which the Supreme Court has recognized a Bivens remedy.”
  • North Carolina state employee health care plan does not cover “gender-confirming” services. Transgender enrollees sue, claiming this violates the Affordable Care Act. Fourth Circuit (over a dissent): You can’t usually sue a state for violating a federal law, but the high standard for waiver of the protections of the Eleventh Amendment was met here (because the plan accepts federal funds conditioned on such a waiver).
  • Prisoners must exhaust all available administrative remedies before filing a claim in federal court. Fifth Circuit: It’s possible that no administrative remedy exists for a Texas prisoner concerned about future retaliation, particularly where officials have already claimed they would “gas [his] ass,” slammed him to the ground, and maced him for filing grievances.
  • After refusing to either join MS-13 or pay a “war tax,” Honduran man and his wife are repeatedly brutalized by the gang. The man enters the U.S. illegally and shows the authorities gruesome photos of his wounds. Immigration judge: He’s likely to be tortured or killed if deported, but deport him we must. The Honduran gov’t is merely unable to protect him. It doesn’t consent or acquiesce to his persecution, which is what the law requires. Fifth Circuit (over a dissent): That’s so. Nothing stopping the feds from using their discretion to let him stay, though.
  • College student gets restraining order against ex-boyfriend who’d broken her nose, pointed a gun at her head. Informed that he’s continuing to stalk her, Ottawa County, Mich. police do little (allegedly upon the request of his father, a fellow officer), for instance, mailing him an arrest warrant rather just arresting him. He kills the student and himself. Sixth Circuit: Her family has no claim against the gov’t.
  • Allegation: A woman is arrested for drunk driving in Tennessee. She’s combative, and an officer tries to force her inside his vehicle, pushing on her knee. Which pops. She ends up with a broken shinbone and a torn ACL. In jail, she’s unsteady and yelling about her knee. But a nurse glances at it for a minute and doesn’t see swelling. Can the injured detainee sue the guard who refused to give her any medical treatment? A majority of the Sixth Circuit says the case goes forward. (The dissent would apply qualified immunity.)
  • Woman takes photos, records video of schoolchildren at Bloomington, Minn. park—the better to share her concern with the community that the Islamic charter school next to the park is overusing and otherwise not keeping to its agreement with the city re: park usage. Eighth Circuit: The First Amendment protects everyone, and the city’s ordinance banning photography and videorecording in public parks is unconstitutional.
  • Is it sex discrimination when an employer favors one employee over another because of a workplace romance? Joining every circuit to consider the question, the Ninth Circuit says no, Title VII liability does not cover paramour preference.
  • Two cannabis activists ask the DEA, with a one-page handwritten petition, to reschedule the drug and make it less illegal. The DEA declines. A different group of people go to court challenging the denial. Ninth Circuit: The group before us has standing, but this lawsuit can’t go forward because they raised different arguments from the original petition (and thus have failed to exhaust their administrative remedies). Concurrence: In the appropriate future case, the DEA’s current classification of marijuana should go up in smoke.
  • Fans of the Seattle Mariners who use wheelchairs sue T-Mobile Park for having inadequate sightlines, in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The Ninth Circuit remands for consideration of DOJ’s 1996 Accessible Stadiums document. Left unanswered is how being unable to see the Mariners play constitutes an injury in fact.
  • After years of trying different kinds of medications (some make his tongue swell so much he can’t talk, others make him grow breasts), man and his doctors at last find a combination that eases the symptoms of his mental illness without such severe side effects. Ninth Circuit: Nevada prison officials probably violated the Eighth Amendment when they ceased providing him those medications.
  • Pursuant to “bulky items” policy, Los Angeles officials summarily destroy homeless people’s property like a dog crate, wooden pallets and a cushion for sleeping, carts used for moving one’s possessions, and bins that a person used to keep their clothes dry. Ninth Circuit (over a dissent): Which probably violates the Fourth Amendment. The city must stop destroying people’s stuff while the suit proceeds.
  • Oklahoma City cop moonlighting as security guard shines flashlight into parked car, startling man who’d apparently been sleeping in driver’s seat with a gun in his lap or in his waistband. The man reaches for the pistol, and the officer shoots him nine times, killing him. Tenth Circuit: No constitutional violation here. Qualified immunity.
  • Allegation: 15-year-old is taken from California against her will to Logan, Utah residential treatment facility, where she’s repeatedly sexually abused. She files a timely suit in California. But the facility transfers the case to Utah, where it’s beyond that state’s statute of limitations and thus dismissed. Tenth Circuit: Just so. Deciding which state’s substantive law applies to a dispute with more than one state connection is complex—there are at least seven approaches in use among the 50 states—but we’re going with Utah here. Dissent: Ought to go with California.
  • The city of Fort Lauderdale, Fla. prevents a local nonprofit from distributing food to the homeless in a public park, which the group challenges as a violation of the First Amendment. Eleventh Circuit: And they’re right. Concurrence (by two judges): But don’t get any ideas. This case had a well-developed record showing that the nonprofit uses these events to spread its particular political message.
  • From this day forward, it’s unconstitutional for police to shoot 20 times at a driver coasting by them unthreateningly, says the Eleventh Circuit. However, since no case has previously said as much, the officers here are entitled to qualified immunity.
  • Georgia voters who vote via absentee ballot can either mail it in or drop it off. Plaintiffs: The stamp voters must provide to mail in an absentee ballot is a poll tax in violation of the 24th Amendment. Eleventh Circuit: It is not, and your claims “border on the frivolous.”
  • After Kennesaw State University cheerleaders kneel during national anthem at football game, Georgia state legislator (who chairs committee controlling public university budgets) and county sheriff tell the university’s president to make them stop. The university responds by keeping the cheerleaders in a tunnel while the anthem is played for several games. Eleventh Circuit (in a ruling with two majority opinions): A cheerleader’s claims against the sheriff can’t go forward.

Earlier this year, the DEA and the Nevada Highway Patrol took nearly $87k in cash from Stephen Lara, a Marine veteran pulled over for following a truck too closely. He had committed no crime and wasn’t arrested. And when the deadline for officials to either return the money or sue to keep it came and went, officials just . . . kept the cash. However, within minutes of The Washington Post publishing a story about the seizure and the launch of an IJ suit seeking a return of the money, the DEA announced it was returning the money this week. The suit is not over, however, as Stephen is also challenging the Nevada Highway Patrol’s power to participate in the federal “equitable sharing” program, which lets state agencies do an end-run around state law and process forfeitures under federal law. Click here to learn more.



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