Republican Attorneys General Plan to Create Roadblocks for Biden

Republican attorneys general are determined to mount numerous legal challenges against President Joe Biden, creating a formidable roadblock to the president’s agenda.

In less than three months since Biden was sworn into office, Republican states have waged war on his agenda, suing the administration on climate change, energy, immigration, and taxation policy. But the conservative attorneys general who started filing the lawsuits in March said they aren’t done yet and expect to continue challenging the administration in court.

“We are sharpening the pencils and filling up the inkwells,” Louisiana Attorney General and former Republican Attorneys General Association Chairman Jeff Landry, who is leading two of the ongoing lawsuits against the Biden administration, told The Daily Caller News Foundation.

Landry said there will be plenty of legal action and success in court against the president and his administration.

Montana Attorney General Austin Knudsen said Republican attorneys general believe that with a gridlocked Congress, states are the last line of defense for Constitutional rights. The attorney general added that he will continue to focus his efforts on Biden’s reliance on executive action, which the president has used to forward several key policy items.

“When you step in on day one and start issuing edicts and executive orders like King George, I and a lot of other conservative Republicans are going to start having problems,” Knudsen said in an interview.

“State attorneys general are coming into their own and realizing they can be an effective pushback against an overreaching executive,” he said.

In his first 11 weeks, Biden has outpaced his immediate predecessors in issuing executive actions, according to The American Presidency Project. Biden has signed 38 executive orders compared to former Presidents Donald Trump, Barack Obama, and George W. Bush, who signed 23, 18, and eight orders, respectively, during their first 11 weeks in office.

Biden signed more executive orders in his first two days in office than Trump signed in his first two months, according to The Economist.

In March, Knudsen led a coalition of 21 states to sue the Biden administration over Biden’s executive order revoking the federal permit for the Keystone XL pipeline. Weeks earlier, Montana joined forces with Arizona, filing a lawsuit against the president over his executive order blocking deportations.

Landry, meanwhile, has led legal challenges against Biden over his executive order banning new oil and gas leases on federal lands and his orders that have allegedly contributed to immigration authorities releasing criminal illegal immigrants into the U.S.

“Democrats are basically hell bent on overreaching, overspending, overregulating,” Landry said. “All things that have detrimental long-term effects on job creation and overall stability for the country.”

And last week, West Virginia led a group of 13 states challenging the Treasury Department over an American Rescue Plan provision prohibiting states from cutting taxes after accepting coronavirus relief funds.

“The Biden administration has already gone much further than Barack Obama. The Obama administration would sometimes pause on various topics and really be very sensitive to the public relations appearance,” West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey told The Daily Caller News Foundation. “Biden is going a lot further across the board.”

“Frequently people talk about separation of powers between the three branches on the federal side: the executive, the legislature, and the judiciary,” he continued. “But there’s also a critical need to ensure that the states don’t get run over by the feds.”

Both Morrisey and Knudsen told The Daily Caller News Foundation that they expect to soon challenge Biden’s recent spate of executive actions targeting gun violence in court.

Over the last four years, Democratic attorneys general led an unprecedented blitz against Trump’s policies, filing hundreds of lawsuits. The Trump administration suffered defeat in nearly 80% of the 207 cases brought against it in court, according to The Institute for Policy Integrity.

A large majority of the cases challenging the Trump administration accused the president of violating the Administrative Procedure Act, The Washington Post reported. The 1946 law mandates that federal agencies provide sufficient reasoning for rules and regulations they put in place.

But Republican attorneys general have now turned the tables, accusing Biden of violating the Administrative Procedure Act. The first lawsuit filed against Biden in March accused him of violating the Administrative Procedure Act when he declared there were “social costs” of continued greenhouse gas emissions in a January executive order.

“They didn’t like the Trump administration violating APA,” Landry told The Daily Caller News Foundation. “But they were quick to violate the APA, as soon as Biden became president.”

In addition, regulatory experts said the Biden administration is in for “rough sailing” when it comes to the potential lawsuits it may face, according to The Wall Street Journal. Because it is expected to continue issuing numerous regulations, the administration will be more vulnerable to challenges.

The White House, though, is reportedly gearing up for the onslaught of court battles, spokesperson Mike Gwin told The Wall Street Journal. Gwin said the administration has a “firm legal footing” while Republican attorneys general have reiterated that they are prepared to win these cases.

“I’m not interested in filing lawsuits just for the sake of a headline,” Knudsen told The Daily Caller News Foundation. “We wouldn’t file these things if we didn’t think there was a legitimate violation and a legitimate chance of winning in court.”

“I file cases because it’s the right thing to do and I think someone’s rights have been violated,” he continued.

Content created by The Daily Caller News Foundation is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a large audience. For licensing opportunities for this original content, email [email protected].

Have an opinion about this article? To sound off, please email [email protected] and we will consider publishing your remarks in our regular “We Hear You” feature.





Source link

EXCLUSIVE: Republican Attorneys General Plan To Create Legal Roadblocks For Biden Agenda

  • Republican attorneys general are determined to mount numerous legal challenges against President Joe Biden, creating a formidable roadblock to the president’s agenda.
  • “When you step in on day one and start issuing edicts and executive orders like King George, I and a lot of other conservative Republicans are going to start having problems,” Montana Attorney General Austin Knudsen told the Daily Caller News Foundation.
  • In less than three months since President Joe Biden was sworn into office, Republican states have waged war on his agenda, suing the administration on climate change, energy, immigration and taxation policy.

Republican attorneys general are determined to mount numerous legal challenges against President Joe Biden, creating a formidable roadblock to the president’s agenda.

In less than three months since President Joe Biden was sworn into office, Republican states have waged war on his agenda, suing the administration on climate change, energy, immigration and taxation policy. But the conservative attorneys general who started filing the lawsuits in March said they aren’t done yet and expect to continue challenging the administration in court.

“We are sharpening the pencils and filling up the inkwells,” Louisiana Attorney General and former Republican Attorneys General Association Chairman Jeff Landry, who is leading two of the ongoing lawsuits against the Biden administration, told the Daily Caller News Foundation.

Landry said there will be plenty of legal action and success in court against the president and his administration. (RELATED: Biden Overstepped Constitutional Authority When He Revoked Keystone Pipeline Permit, Multiple States Allege In Lawsuit)

Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry is joined by other Republican attorneys general at a press conference outside the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 22, 2020. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Montana Attorney General Austin Knudsen said Republican attorneys general believe that with a gridlocked Congress, states are the last line of defense for Constitutional rights. The attorney general added that he will continue to focus his efforts on Biden’s reliance on executive action, which the president has used to forward several key policy items.

“When you step in on day one and start issuing edicts and executive orders like King George, I and a lot of other conservative Republicans are going to start having problems,” Knudsen said in an interview.

“State attorneys general are coming into their own and realizing they can be an effective pushback against an overreaching executive,” he said. (RELATED: 13 States Sue Biden Administration Over Federal Oil And Gas Leasing Ban)

In his first 11 weeks, Biden has outpaced his immediate predecessors in issuing executive actions, according to The American Presidency Project. Biden has signed 38 executive orders compared to former Presidents Donald Trump, Barack Obama and George W. Bush who signed 23, 18 and 8 orders respectively during their first 11 weeks in office.

Biden signed more executive orders in his first two days in office than Trump signed in his first two months, according to The Economist.

Miles of unused pipe, prepared for the proposed Keystone XL pipeline, sit in a lot on Oct. 14, 2014 in North Dakota. (Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

Miles of unused pipe, prepared for the proposed Keystone XL pipeline, sit in a lot on Oct. 14, 2014 in North Dakota. (Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

In March, Knudsen led a coalition of 21 states to sue the Biden over his executive order revoking the federal permit for the Keystone XL Pipeline. Weeks earlier, Montana joined forces with Arizona, filing a lawsuit against the president over his executive order blocking deportations.

Landry, meanwhile, has led legal challenges against Biden over his executive order banning new oil and gas leases on federal lands and his orders that have allegedly contributed to immigration authorities releasing criminal illegal immigrants into the U.S.

“Democrats are basically hell bent on overreaching, overspending, over-regulating,” Landry said. “All things that have detrimental long term effects on job creation, and overall stability for the country.” (RELATED: 13 States Sue Biden Administration, Demand Ability To Cut Taxes)

And last week, West Virginia led a group of 13 states challenging the Treasury Department over an American Rescue Plan provision prohibiting states from cutting taxes after accepting coronavirus relief funds.

“The Biden administration has already gone much further than Barack Obama. The Obama administration would sometimes pause on various topics and really be very sensitive to the public relations appearance,” West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey told the DCNF. “Biden is going a lot further across the board.”

“Frequently people talk about separation of powers between the three branches on the federal side: the executive, the legislature and the judiciary,” he continued. “But there’s also a critical need to ensure that the states don’t get run over by the Feds.”

Both Morrisey and Knudsen told the DCNF that they expect to soon challenge Biden’s recent spate of executive actions targeting gun violence in court.

President Joe Biden meets with Vice President Kamala Harris and Secretary of the Treasury Janet Yellen at the White House on Friday. (Amr Alfiky/Pool/Getty Images)

U.S. President Joe Biden (3rd L) meets with (L-R) Director of the National Economic Council Brian Deese, Vice President Kamala Harris, and Secretary of the Treasury Janet Yellen during the weekly economic briefing in the Oval Office at the White House on April 9, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Amr Alfiky-Pool/Getty Images)

Over the last four years, Democratic attorneys general led an unprecedented blitz against Trump’s policies, filing hundreds of lawsuits. The Trump administration suffered defeat in nearly 80% of the 207 cases brought against it in court, according to The Institute for Policy Integrity.

A large majority of the cases challenging the Trump administration accused the president of violating the Administrative Procedure Act (APA), The Washington Post reported. The 1946 law mandates that federal agencies provide sufficient reasoning for rules and regulations they put in place.

But Republican attorneys general have now turned the tables, accusing Biden of violating the APA. The first lawsuit filed against Biden in March accused him of violating the APA when he declared there were “social costs” of continued greenhouse gas emissions in a January executive order.

“They didn’t like the Trump administration violating APA,” Landry told the DCNF. “But they were quick to violate the APA, as soon as Biden became president.” (RELATED: 12 States Sue Biden Administration Over Climate Policies, ‘Massive Expansion’ Of Regulations)

In addition, regulatory experts said the Biden administration is in for “rough sailing” when it comes to the potential lawsuits it may face, according to the Wall Street Journal. Because it is expected to continue issuing numerous regulations, the administration will be more vulnerable to challenges.

The White House, though, is reportedly gearing up for the onslaught of court battles, spokesperson Mike Gwin told the WSJ. Gwin said the administration has a “firm legal footing” while Republican attorneys general have reiterated that they are prepared to win these cases.

“I’m not interested in filing lawsuits just for the sake of a headline,” Knudsen told the DCNF. “We wouldn’t file these things if we didn’t think there was a legitimate violation and a legitimate chance of winning in court.”

“I file cases because it’s the right thing to do and I think someone’s rights have been violated,” he continued.

Content created by The Daily Caller News Foundation is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a large audience. For licensing opportunities of our original content, please contact licensing@dailycallernewsfoundation.org.



Source link

Cuomo insistence on development funds for single project among key budget roadblocks: Report

One of the projects stymieing New York state’s $200 billion budget, which was due Thursday, is a $1.3 billion bond request by Gov. Andrew Cuomo to transform a part of midtown Manhattan, the New York Daily News reported this week.

As part of Cuomo’s post-COVID-19 rebuilding plan, he called for spending $51 billion to redevelop an area near Penn Station that would, among other things, replace the Port Authority Bus Terminal. The Daily News reported Wednesday that Cuomo wanted the bonding “to help build 10 massive” towers in city block south of Penn Station.

A source told the Daily News it’s a “sweetheart deal” for developers who have funded the governor’s political campaigns. One of the landowners in the area is Stephen Roth, chairman of Vornado Reality. Over the last 16 years, Roth and his wife have given more than $400,000 to Cuomo’s campaigns. That includes $130,000 just three years ago.

Cuomo spokesman Rich Azzopardi told the paper the governor’s actions have not been influenced by any contributor.

The report is the latest story or allegation hounding a governor under investigation for both his nursing home policies during the early stages of the coronavirus pandemic as well as multiple sexual harassment complaints. There have also been reports that the governor’s office gave preferential treatment to family members and others, allowing them to get special access to COVID-19 testing at the onset of the pandemic as it was spreading rapidly across New York City.

At the time of the governor’s announcement, state Sen. Brad Hoylman said the plan would “re-energize” the district.

“For decades, Penn Station has been a vexing issue for my district and for the entire region,” he said in a release issued by the governor’s office. “I look forward to working with the community and local stakeholders to bring the vision of the Empire Station Complex to life and continuing Penn Station’s transformation and track expansion.”

On Wednesday, though, he has a different tune for the Daily News, saying the plan doesn’t allow for any local input.

“From a wider perspective, one has to ask why the state is looking to get into speculative real estate development, especially at this juncture,” he said. “We want to fight for genuine community engagement before this project gets baked.”





Source link