By golly, that 60 Minutes hit job on DeSantis might have “deceptively edited” video! – HotAir

Ya think? PolitiFact decided to creep up on the obvious yesterday after everyone else but CBS News acknowledged it. That heavily edited video at the heart of the execrable 60 Minutes smear of Ron DeSantis and Publix “could” — just could — be deceptive, PolitiFact concluded:

“Deceptive editing” means a clip “has been edited and rearranged,” according to the Washington Post’s guide to manipulated video. Deceptive editing can include omission (“editing out large portions from a video and presenting it as a complete narrative” to “skew reality”) and splicing (“editing together disparate videos (that) fundamentally alters the story that is being told”).

By omitting DeSantis’ remarks on why the state partnered with Publix to distribute vaccines in Palm Beach County, the “60 Minutes” clip could fall into the former category.

As Allahpundit wrote last night in passing in his post about DeSantis, for cripe’s sake. Given PolitiFact’s standing within the journalism industry — it’s run by Poynter Institute — this reluctance to call out the deception is worth a closer look in terms of wagon-circling by the guild. PolitiFact appears to credit CBS News’ claim that this is routine editing for “clarity,” a claim which gets much less credit when made by, say, James O’Keefe and Project Veritas.

The deception in this case is blindingly obvious. The video aired by 60 Minutes shows Sharyn Alfonsi demanding answers from DeSantis in the press conference and DeSantis apparently refusing to provide them. The full video of the presser, however, shows DeSantis providing detailed answers about the Publix partnership, answers edited out of the 60 Minutes segment. Behind the scenes, DeSantis’ office implored 60 Minutes to contact two key Democrats in arranging the partnership — a point never mentioned in the segment.

Interestingly, Poynter’s senior faculty drills down even further into the deception, which goes well beyond the video. Al Tompkins points out that Alfonsi and 60 Minutes never offered any evidence of a corrupt pay-for-play arrangement despite making that allegation. They owe everyone an explanation for how that got on the air, Tompkins tells PolitiFact:

“In the story, there was a direct line between the campaign contribution and the rewarding. And they never proved that,” said Al Tompkins, a senior faculty member at the Poynter Institute, a nonprofit journalism school that owns PolitiFact. “I think they owe it to everybody — they owe it to the governor, they owe it to Publix, they owe it to the public — to explain to us how they came to that conclusion.”

In other words, PolitiFact missed the forest for the tree video. The entire segment was a deception. Alfonsi and 60 Minutes set out to build a corruption narrative on DeSantis and Publix, were told it was “bullshit,” and ran it anyway. Now CBS News and 60 Minutes wants to pretend that there’s a story here, and PolitiFact wants to provide at least a modicum of cover for an absurd modified limited hangout.

Not every media outlet is as generous. The editorial board of the Daytona Beach News-Journal, not usually a friend to DeSantis, blasted CBS News in its paper today. When they criticize DeSantis, the editors scold, they make sure to present evidence for their complaints — and don’t omit the truth for convenience:

We never felt the need, however, to leave out critical information that we were aware of, just because it didn’t support our argument. While we always look for ways to illustrate the human impact of governmental decisions, it is never our intention to use emotional quotes and angry rhetoric to bolster an argument that is too weak to stand unsupported.

And we’re Opinion journalists. Our newsrooms around the state — which are operate independently from Opinion — have adhered to the principle that their job is to report news fairly, fully and accurately. When DeSantis has something to say, they report it. When experts weigh in on those plans, we report that too.

We’ve watched the 60 Minutes segment on Florida’s vaccine rollout. We don’t think it meets the standards that should be applied to news coverage — which is what the venerable CBS program holds itself out to be. We don’t think it even clears the bar as responsible opinion.

Florida, and its governor, deserved better.

So did viewers of CBS News and 60 Minutes. And so do readers of PolitiFact.



Source link

CBS faces bipartisan backlash after ’60 Minutes’ aired selectively edited footage of DeSantis

CBS is facing bipartisan backlash after using heavily edited footage of Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis in a”60 Minutes” story alleging potential political corruption on the part of the Republican politician. 

“60 Minutes” reporter Sharyn Alfonsi alleged in a recent report for the long-running news magazine that wealthy residents of Florida “cut the line during [the state’s] frenzied vaccine rollout.” In the segment, Alfonsi suggested that the state government’s recent decision to award a vaccine distribution contract to the grocery chain Publix had the appearance of potential favoritism. 

Citing public financial records, Alfonsi noted that “weeks before the governor’s announcement, Publix donated $100,000 to his political action committee, Friends of Ron DeSantis.” As part of the report, Alfonsi questioned DeSantis at a late March press conference about the arrangement, suggesting the governor had engaged in “pay-to-play” with the grocery chain. 

The report presented DeSantis as having given about a 30-second response in which the governor gave a brief, hasty explanation of the deal and then spent a significant amount of time criticizing Alfonsi herself. 

Yet full footage of the press conference showed that in responding to Alfonsi’s query, the governor actually spoke for just over two minutes. In his response, DeSantis said that among the retailers to which the state reached out Publix was “the first one to raise their hands.” A subsequent trial run with Publix went well, he said, leading the state to expand the program. 

DeSantis also argued that there was a significant practical component to the decision to use Publix. Some public officials he spoke to, he said, “calculated that 90% of their seniors live within a mile and a half of a Publix.” The state, he said, plans to use other retailers in the near future. 

State Democrats slam ‘intentionally false’ reporting

DeSantis himself subsequently slammed the report, claiming it was “selectively edited” and was “done with malicious intent and a reckless disregard for the truth.”

The governor’s language was likely carefully chosen: Establishing “reckless disregard for the truth” is a key aspect of defamation law, with plaintiffs usually having to prove that element  to win a libel suit. 

Whether or not DeSantis will mount such an effort remains unclear. Yet in the days since its report, CBS has been broadly criticized not just by conservatives but by a bipartisan chorus including some Florida Democrats. 

Jared Moskowitz, a Democratic politician in the state and the head of Florida’s Division of Emergency Management, last week slammed the insinuations from the news outlet that the choice of Publix had been untoward. 

“I said this before and I’ll say it again,” he wrote on Twitter. “[Publix] was recommended by [Emergency Management] and [the Florida Department of Health] as the other pharmacies were not ready to start. Period! Full Stop!” 

“No one from the Governors office suggested Publix,” he added. “It’s just absolute malarkey.”

A Monday statement from Palm Beach County’s Democratic Mayor Dave Kerner, meanwhile, echoed DeSantis’s allegation that the “60 Minutes” segment was deliberately misleading. 

“The reporting was not just based on bad information — it was intentionally false,” he wrote. “I know this because I offered to provide my insight into Palm Beach County’s vaccination efforts and 60 minutes [sic] declined. They know that the Governor came to Palm Beach County and met with me and the County Administration and we asked to expand the state’s partnership with Publix to Palm Beach County.” 

“We asked and he delivered,” Kerner continued. “They had that information, and they left it out because it kneecaps their narrative.”

In a statement, CBS appeared to dispute Kerner’s version of events. 

“Counter to his statement yesterday, we … spoke on the record with Palm Beach County Mayor David Kerner,” Kevin Tedesco, the director of communications for “60 Minutes,” told Just the News. 

Tedesco also said the program “spoke to State Emergency Management Director Jared Moskowitz twice, but he declined to be interviewed on camera for our story until well after our deadline,” and that “60 Minutes” also “requested an interview with Gov. Ron DeSantis” but “he declined.”

Neither Moskowitz’s nor Kerner’s offices responded to requests for clarification on what information they shared with “60 Minutes.” Defending the program’s editing of DeSantis’ remarks, Tedesco further said: “As we always do for clarity, 60 MINUTES used the portion of the Governor’s over 2-minute response that directly addressed the question from the correspondent.”

Publix itself, meanwhile, slammed “60 Minutes'” for what it said were its “irresponsible” and “false and offensive” insinuations.

“We are proud of our pharmacy associates for administering more than 1.5 million doses of vaccine to date,” the chain said, “and for joining other retailers in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia to do our part to help our communities emerge from the pandemic.

Dan Kennedy, a professor at Northeastern University’s School of Journalism, told Just the News that “60 Minutes” had gone too far in editing DeSantis’s remarks. 

“It’s perfectly ethical for journalists to use as little or as much as they want from an interview or, as is the case here, from someone’s remarks at a news conference,” he argued. “What’s not ethical is to edit quotes in a way that changes the meaning of what the person said or that leaves out important context. Based on watching the confrontation as edited for broadcast and then watching Gov. DeSantis’ full remarks, it seems clear that ’60 Minutes’ fell short of the standard.”

According to the Florida Department of Health, as of Tuesday the state had vaccinated over 6,400,000 of its residents, with the majority of vaccinations administered to those 55 and older. 





Source link

60 Minutes — Ron DeSantis’s Publix Vaccinations Answer Edited

CBS’s 60 Minutes alleged that Florida governor Ron DeSantis enlisted grocery chain Publix to help with coronavirus vaccine distribution because of a campaign contribution, but edited DeSantis’s full response to the allegation.

“Publix, as you know, donated $100,000 to your campaign, and then you rewarded them with exclusive rights to vaccination in Palm Beach,” a CBS reporter said at a press conference for the governor in Orlando. DeSantis said the reporter peddled a “fake narrative” when she alleged he engaged in a “pay-for-play” scheme.

However, 60 Minutes omitted a key section of DeSantis’s response, in which he states that the first pharmacies to take charge of vaccine distribution were CVS and Walgreens, and were initially tasked with vaccinating residents of long-term care facilities.

DeSantis said that in January the state wanted to expand distribution sites and contacted other large chains with pharmacies.

“You had the counties, you had some drive-thru sites, you had hospitals that were doing a lot, but we wanted to get it into communities more,” DeSantis said. “So we reached out to other retail pharmacies: Publix, Walmart, obviously CVS and Walgreens had to finish that mission and we said we’re going to use you as soon as you’re done with that.”

DeSantis has grown in popularity among GOP voters, who view the governor as a potential presidential candidate in 2024 if President Trump decides not to run again.

In particular, the governor has touted his state’s refusal to close schools and businesses in Fall 2020 as part of its response to the coronavirus pandemic, decisions that were popular among Republicans. Florida’s death rate and new daily coronavirus cases per 100,000 people have been roughly average among U.S. states throughout the pandemic.

Send a tip to the news team at NR.

Zachary Evans is a news writer for National Review Online. He is a veteran of the Israeli Defense Forces and a trained violist.





Source link

(Updated): ‘Absolute malarkey’: ’60 Minutes’ airs deceptively edited segment accusing Gov. Ron DeSantis of corruption

Updated 4/5/2021, 3:45 p.m. ET: The Democratic mayor of Palm Beach County, Dave Kerner, on Monday said he felt “compelled” to issue a statement after watching the “60 Minutes” segment featuring Gov. Ron DeSantis and vaccination efforts in the county.

“The reporting was not just based on bad information — it was intentionally false,” Kerner said. “I know this because I offered to provide my insight into Palm Beach County’s vaccination efforts and 60 minutes declined. They know that the Governor came to Palm Beach County and met with me and the County Administrator and we asked to expand the state’s partnership with Publix to Palm Beach County. We also discussed our own local plans to expand mass vaccination centers throughout the county, which the Governor has been incredibly supportive. We asked and he delivered. They had that information, and they left it out because it kneecaps their narrative.

“We have confronted this pandemic for over a year. Our residents, like all Americans, are tired. And the media is making it worse. They are hellbent on dividing us for cheap views and clicks. 60 Minutes should be ashamed,” he continued.

Original story continues below …

CBS News’ “60 Minutes” was blasted on Sunday by a top Democratic official in Florida and the state’s largest grocery store chain after it aired a deceptively edited segment insinuating that Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) engaged in a “pay to play” scheme with COVID-19 vaccine distribution.

On Sunday evening, CBS News’ Sharyn Alfonsi reported that DeSantis received a $100,000 donation to his PAC from Publix grocery stores, which later partnered with the state to distribute COVID-19 vaccines. “60 Minutes” aired a clip of Alfonsi confronting DeSantis at a new conference south of Orlando, accusing the governor of “pay to play” by giving Publix exclusive rights to distribute the vaccine after he received that donation.

The governor said Alfonsi was “wrong” and spreading a “fake narrative” and proceeded to correct the record, but his long answer was cut out of the segment by CBS News’ editors.

The Daily Wire reported the transcript of the segment, highlighting in bold the parts of DeSantis’ answer that were edited out of the clip.

Sharyn Alfonsi: Publix, as you know, donated $100,000 to your campaign, and then you rewarded them with the exclusive rights to distribute the vaccination in Palm Beach—

Ron DeSantis: So, first of all, that — what you’re saying is wrong. That’s—

Sharyn Alfonsi: How is that not pay-to-play?

Ron DeSantis: —that, that’s a fake narrative. So, first of all, when we did, the first pharmacies that had it were CVS and Walgreens. And they had a long-term care mission. So they were going to the long-term care facilities. They got the vaccine in the middle of December, they started going to the long-term care facilities the third week of December to do LTCs. So that was their mission. That was very important. And we trusted them to do that. As we got into January, we wanted to expand the distribution points. So yes, you had the counties, you had some drive-through sites, you had hospitals that were doing a lot, but we wanted to get it into communities more. So we reached out to other retail pharmacies — Publix, Walmart — obviously CVS and Walgreens had to finish that mission. And we said, we’re going to use you as soon as you’re done with that. For Publix, they were the first one to raise their hand, say they were ready to go. And you know what, we did it on a trial basis. I had three counties. I actually showed up that weekend and talked to seniors across four different Publix. How was the experience? Is this good? Should you think this is a way to go? And it was 100% positive. So we expanded it, and then folks liked it. And I can tell you, if you look at a place like Palm Beach County, they were kind of struggling at first in terms of the senior numbers. I went, I met with the county mayor. I met with the administrator. I met with all the folks in Palm Beach County, and I said, “Here’s some of the options: we can do more drive-through sites, we can give more to hospitals, we can do the Publix, we can do this.” They calculated that 90% of their seniors live within a mile and a half of a Publix. And they said, “We think that would be the easiest thing for our residents.” So, we did that, and what ended up happening was, you had 65 Publix in Palm Beach. Palm Beach is one of the biggest counties, one of the most elderly counties, we’ve done almost 75% of the seniors in Palm Beach, and the reason is because you have the strong retail footprint. So our way has been multifaceted. It has worked. And we’re also now very much expanding CVS and Walgreens, now that they’ve completed the long-term care mission.

Sharyn Alfonsi: The criticism is that it’s pay-to-play, governor.

Ron DeSantis: And it’s wrong. It’s wrong. It’s a fake narrative. I just disabused you of the narrative. And you don’t care about the facts. Because, obviously, I laid it out for you in a way that is irrefutable.

Sharyn Alfonsi: Well, I— I was just—

Ron DeSantis: And, so, it’s clearly not.

Sharyn Alfonsi: Isn’t there the nearest Publix —

Ron DeSantis: No, no, no. You’re wrong.

Sharyn Alfonsi: —30 miles away.

Ron DeSantis: You’re wrong. You’re wrong. Yes, sir?

Sharyn Alfonsi: That’s actually a fact.

“The irresponsible suggestion that there was a connection between campaign contributions made to Governor DeSantis and our willingness to join other pharmacies in support of the state’s vaccine distribution efforts is absolutely false and offensive,” Publix said in a scathing statement provided to “60 Minutes.”

“We are proud of our pharmacy associates for administering more than 1.5 million doses of vaccine to date and for joining other retailers in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia to do our part to help our communities emerge from the pandemic,” the grocery store said.

Florida’s director of emergency management, Jared Moskowitz, the Democratic state official responsible for directing the response to the pandemic under Gov. DeSantis, came to the governor’s defense and called Alfonsi’s narrative “absolute malarkey.”





Source link