The View’s Navarro Says She Now Has Tested COVID Negative Twice After Kamala Chaos – RedState

As we reported on Friday, Kamala Harris was set to join the table of co-hosts on ABC’s “The View” as a guest, when two of the co-hosts learned what appeared to be shocking news live on air. Their tests for COVID came back positive, leading to a chaotic moment when both Ana Navarro and fellow co-host Sunny Hostin were whisked backstage by producers, which my colleague Nick Arama wrote about.

We also reported on the short interview they ended up doing remotely with Kamala, from another area of the building.

As Nick shared, all the nattering nabobs at the table managed to do was give Harris, the Biden Administration’s most do-nothing member on the border crisis, a platform to spew dishonest slander about CPS and the fake “whipping” at Del Rio narrative they continue to sell to the American people.

“I was outraged by it, it was horrible, and deeply troubling…[T]here needs to be consequences…Human beings should not be treated that way and it also evoked images of some of the worst moments of our history” where such ‘”behavior” has been used like in times of “slavery,” Harris claimed.

Later on Friday night, Ana Navarro joined CNN’s Anderson Cooper on his show. She told him she and her co-hosts were looking forward to the big interview and prepared to ask Kamala “tough questions,” a dubious claim if there ever was one. But the biggest revelation in the interview was that Navarro has taken at least two COVID tests (both the antigen and the PCR tests) since the show — and both results were negative.

Navarro added that “[a]ll indications are that those were false positives,” since both she and Hostin have now tested negative for COVID. While she said she didn’t want to speak for Hostin beyond that, she revealed that she was waiting for the results of yet a third test, “so I can fly home to Miami” to be with her family there.

Let’s think about this testing thing a moment, readers. During the CNN interview, Navarro explained that, as she only appears on “The View” a couple times a week, she would describe her tests for COVID as weekly — as she put it, “every time I come into the building.”

To me, that doesn’t make a lick of sense. By all indications, Navarro and Hostin (and all of “The View” co-hosts) are fully vaccinated against COVID. Isn’t testing supposed to be reserved for unvaccinated people or those with symptoms of the Chinese flu? I’ve never taken a COVID test — not once. This is saying the quiet part out loud by the left, since it puts a lie to the assurances by the government — and by companies and organizations ready to bend over for government coercion — who are gung-ho about more people being vaccinated… that if you are vaccinated, you can go about your daily life normally.

No, it appears that is not the case, if someone is being forced to have invasive tests for COVID several times a week. Also, Navarro mentioned that the rest of the show’s production team wears masks — just like the unimportant people behind the cameras on the Emmys last weekend. Seems legit.

And what good does it all do, but to lead to a panic over false positive tests when a high-ranking government official is nearby?

I’ve gotta say…if your goal, as it appears the Biden Administration and its allies in the legacy media have, is to convince more so-called ‘vaccine hesitant’ Americans to get the jab, this is not the way to do it.





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Chris Cuomo — Shelley Ross Accuses CNN Anchor of Sexual Harassment

Journalist Shelley Ross accused CNN anchor Chris Cuomo of sexually harassing her at a party in 2005, in an op-ed in the New York Times published Friday morning.

Ross wrote that Cuomo grabbed her buttocks at a going-away party for a colleague at ABC, in the presence of her husband. Up until shortly before the incident, Ross was Cuomo’s executive producer at ABC’s Primetime Live.

Cuomo “greeted me with a strong bear hug while lowering one hand to firmly grab and squeeze the cheek of my buttock,” Ross wrote in the op-ed. “‘I can do this now that you’re no longer my boss,’ [Cuomo] said to me with a kind of cocky arrogance. ‘No you can’t,’ I said, pushing him off me at the chest.”

Ross provided a screenshot of an email Cuomo allegedly sent after the incident, whose subject line reads “now that i think of it…i am ashamed.”

“christian slater got arrested for a (kind of) similar act (though borne of an alleged negative intent, unlike my own),” Cuomo wrote. “so pass along my apology to your very good and noble husband…and i apologize to you as well, for even putting you in such a position.”

Actor Christian Slater was arrested in May 2005 for allegedly groping a woman’s butt while intoxicated, although the charges were later dropped.

Ross’s allegation comes several months after Cuomo apologized for advising his brother, former New York governor Andrew Cuomo, on how to deal with allegations of sexual harassment. Chris Cuomo had participated in strategy calls with the former governor and his aides, the Washington Post reported.

“When my brother’s situation became turbulent, being looped into calls with other friends of his and advisors that did include some of his staff, I understand why that was a problem for CNN,” Cuomo said during his show on CNN. “It will not happen again.”

Cuomo was also involved in drafting a statement for the former governor released on February 28 defending against allegations of harassment, according to New York attorney general Letitia James’s report on the allegations.

Ross wrote that she didn’t consider Cuomo’s 2005 action “sexual in nature,” but as a “hostile act” intended to “belittle his female former boss.”

“As Shelley acknowledges, our interaction was not sexual in nature,” Cuomo told the Times. “It happened 16 years ago in a public setting when she was a top executive at ABC. I apologized to her then, and I meant it.”

Cuomo discussed allegations of sexual harassment against him in conversation with Michael Cohen, former attorney for President Trump, in audio obtained by Fox News‘s Tucker Carlson. Cuomo tells Cohen about reporters calling ABC to try and find stories about him.

“Guys calling and saying, ‘I heard he was the Charlie Rose of ABC, he used to invite women to a hotel and open his bathrobe,” Cuomo can be heard telling Cohen. “Do I look like the kind of f***ing guy who’s got to do that?”

Cohen responds, “Sure, why not?”

Send a tip to the news team at NR.

Zachary Evans is a news writer for National Review Online. He is a veteran of the Israeli Defense Forces and a trained violist.





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Chris Cuomo Accused of Sexual Harassment; Accuser Has Bizarre Email From Him Acknowledging Act – RedState

There’s a reason that Chris Cuomo is called “Fredo” and this story surely proves it.

He’s not the sharpest tool in the shed.

He also apparently takes after his brother in ways that are not good. He not only gave his brother advice during Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s sexual harassment scandal, he now has an alleged issue of his own.

A former ABC executive producer is now accusing him of having sexually harassed her when they worked together at ABC news.

The producer, Shelley Ross, wrote an essay for the New York Times in which she outlined what had occurred.

Ross says that he hugged her and grabbed her buttock without her permission in 2005.

From Fox News:

“At the time, I was the executive producer of an ABC entertainment special, but I was Mr. Cuomo’s executive producer at ‘Primetime Live’ just before that,” she wrote. “I was at the party with my husband, who sat behind me on an ottoman sipping his Diet Coke as I spoke with work friends. When Mr. Cuomo entered the Upper West Side bar, he walked toward me and greeted me with a strong bear hug while lowering one hand to firmly grab and squeeze the cheek of my buttock.”

Ross said Cuomo told her, “I can do this now that you’re no longer my boss”, and did it “with a kind of cocky arrogance.” Ross said she told him he couldn’t, pushed him off her and revealed her husband was right behind her, and they quickly left the party, which was celebrating an ABC colleague’s departure.

The kicker, though? She has an email from him apparently admitting it, even suggesting someone could be arrested for the behavior.

“[T]hough my hearty greeting was a function of being glad to see you….christian slater got arrested for a (kind of) similar act, (though borne of an alleged negative intent, unlike my own)….and as a husband I can empathize with not liking to see my wife patted as such,” he wrote.

Cuomo, who was 34 at the time of the alleged incident, asked Ross to pass along an apology to her “very good and noble husband,” and also “I apologize to you as well, for even putting you in such a position.” He added he would remember his lesson the next time he was happy to see her.

Christian Slater was arrested in 2005 for touching a random woman on the buttock in NYC. He was charged with third degree sexual abuse. The email from Cuomo would appear to show his acknowledgement of his wrongdoing and his belief that in fact what he did was potentially a crime.

Even the email is reminiscent of his brother — acknowledging the act but then trying to justify it in some way as not really being what it appeared. Truly creepy.

Ross said she was speaking out now because of Cuomo’s attitude after his brother’s scandal. Cuomo said in March that he cared “very deeply about these issues” [sexual harassment] and then after his brother. stepped down he worked a “Truth” t-shirt.

“For me, his statement of profound concern about sexual harassment and his ‘Truth’ T-shirt were provocations in this era of personal accountability,” she wrote.

Ross said she didn’t want him to be fired but she wanted him to “journalistically repent.”

“I’m not asking for Mr. Cuomo to become the next casualty in this continuing terrible story. I hope he stays at CNN forever if he chooses. I would, however, like to see him journalistically repent: agree on air to study the impact of sexism, harassment and gender bias in the workplace, including his own, and then report on it,” Ross wrote. “He could host a series of live town hall meetings, with documentary footage, produced by women with expert consultants. Call it ‘The Continuing Education of Chris Cuomo’ and make this a watershed moment instead of another stain on the career of one more powerful male news anchor.”

While CNN didn’t respond to the story, Cuomo gave a statement to the New York Times.

“As Shelley acknowledges, our interaction was not sexual in nature. It happened 16 years ago in a public setting when she was a top executive at ABC. I apologized to her then, and I meant it,” Cuomo said.

Cuomo did not immediately respond to a request for additional comment by Fox News.

The bottom line, though, is that Cuomo has never been held accountable. CNN let him promote his brother on his show, then let him avoid coverage of the scandal. CNN didn’t hold him to any real account for advising his brother during the sexual harassment scandal. CNN never held him to account for breaking quarantine and pushing a false story on the network about his emergence for the first time from the basement. So if she thinks he’s suddenly going to have a miraculous change, I wouldn’t bet on it. Even his response, in which he’s claiming she said it wasn’t “sexual in nature” is a diminishment of what she said.





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CNN: Do NOT “Do Your Own Research” on COVID Vaccines

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“Vaccines save lives.” “Vaccines are safe and effective.” “Vaccines will get us back to normal.” “All eligible Americans must take a vaccine.” Americans have been bombarded with this mantra 24/7 since the experimental gene therapeutics, aka “COVID vaccines,” became available to the general public in April of this year.

As the vaccination campaign gained steam, it turned out that COVID vaccines are not, in fact, as safe as they were said to be. The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) had started filling up with numerous reports on side effects, from mild ones to such serious and life-threatening reactions as blood clotting, hemorrhages, unstoppable bleeding, heart issues, miscarriages, and deaths. While, arguably, not every single event was connected to the vaccine, the trend was truly alarming. In addition to that, the true numbers of adverse effects are likely much higher, since only about 10 percent of all cases are being reported to the system.  

As the media and top officials turned a blind eye to the troubling reports, and Big Tech started to censor all stories of people suffering adverse reactions after being inoculated, many practicing doctors started to speak up and sound the alarm regarding the jabs’ safety. No matter how renowned and prominent, all of them were called “conspiracy theorists” and shut down from most of the public platforms.

Further, it turns out that the vaccines do not prevent one from getting the virus or transmitting it to others. After reports of breakthrough infections were already appearing on the web for at least a month, President Biden stated on July 21, “You’re not going to get COVID if you have these vaccinations.”

On July 31, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) contradicted the president’s words in a statement that the viral load vaccinated and unvaccinated people carry when infected is “similar.” The vaccination was still recommended to everyone since it was said to reduce the risk of severe COVID complications.

In this confusing situation, both federal and some local governments, as well as private businesses, took the vaccination campaign on the offensive, and switched from cajoling people into getting jabbed to coercing them to do so — or face negative consequences, such as losing a job.

Still, the mainstream media shames vaccine-hesitant Americans for not rolling up their sleeves. The latest target of the mainstream-media attack is people’s independent research on vaccines.  

“Four little words — ‘do your own research’ — are hurting the US pandemic response,” warned CNN’s Ramishah Maruf, citing chief media correspondent Brian Stelter.

While admitting that “it may seem like a reasonable, even positive, attitude,” it is, at the same time, “a favored talking point echoed by many in the right-wing media,” Maruf claims. Presumably, it means that independent research is a tool that the conservative-leaning journalists encourage people to use in order to increase vaccine hesitancy and, therefore, undermine the whole vaccination campaign.

One may wonder, “Why would it hurt to watch this podcast with mRNA technology inventor Dr. Robert Malone? After all, he seems reputable enough to say something valuable about the jabs that employ technology that he pioneered.”

One should not do such a thing, CNN explains, first of all, because most people are not smart enough to understand such an information: “Most people simply don’t know how to do their own research, especially when it comes to understanding the complexities of medical science.”

Secondly, in the current media environment, Maruf argues, people often fall victim to the “misleading data that confirms biases.” And she is not wrong, actually. The media bias and political interest was on full display during the presidential campaign of 2020, when Maruf’s own outlet admitted it was engaged in generating public panic over COVID only to hurt Donald Trump’s chances for reelection. On a different occasion, many of the liberal outlets who rooted for Joe Biden stated they “made a mistake” by dismissing the Wuhan lab-leak theory of COVID origin in 2020 because it was supported by Trump. Thus, if the media environment is not a place to look for reliable information, it is because of CNN and its ilk.

Maruf quotes Renee DiResta, research manager at the Stanford Internet Observatory, who laments, “Nobody’s going to the library and looking up authoritative sources to do their own research.” But what if they do? See point number 1 and get a medical degree.

Maruf then quotes Yael Eisenstat, a Future of Democracy fellow at the Berggruen Institute, saying that the media “needs to be more transparent in its reporting, especially when it comes to Covid.” This is because, Maruf claims, there are “subtle differences between understanding scientific research that is still theoretical versus that which has been tested and widely agreed upon.” DiResta adds that “Science is a consensus building process.” 

The latter statement implies that if the “scientists” (or whoever talk on behalf of “science” and are called “experts” on TV) agree that the vaccines are safe, then it must be true. The evidence may change, and if the “scientists” chose to agree on something else, then the previous statement becomes invalid.

This type of logic is painfully reminiscent of George Orwell’s 1984, where the Party could announce that Oceania had always been at war with Eurasia and allied with East Asia, only to later announce that Oceania had always been at war with East Asia and allied with Eurasia, and the people were expected to believe both claims. In the same vein, the Party could also claim that two plus two equals five, and it would be so, because in that dystopian world, the reality was internal and did not rely on physical evidence. It only existed in the mind of the rulers, who projected it onto the public: “Whatever the Party holds to be the truth, is truth.”

That is the type of reality the corporate media and their masters are pushing on America. So please, do your own research and see for yourself that 2+2=4.



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Those Criticizing ‘Missing White Woman Syndrome’ Are Right – But There’s One Problem – RedState

Laci Peterson. Amber Hagerman. Elizabeth Smart. Chandra Levy. JonBenet Ramsey. Natalie Holloway.

Many Americans have heard of at least one of these names which became prominent over the past few decades. These are women who went missing under suspicious circumstances. In most cases, they met a tragic end similar to that of Gabrielle Petito.

It is not difficult to see what each of these women has in common. In fact, there is now an ongoing debate over the fact that the media typically highlights cases in which white women and girls go missing while mostly ignoring similar cases involving black and brown women. These news stories are far more likely to gain nationwide coverage than those that involve minorities.

This tendency on the part of the media has been dubbed “Missing White Woman Syndrome.” Media activists like MSNBC’s Joy Reid are using this term amid the ongoing news coverage of the Petito case. During a recent broadcast, she said:

It goes without saying that no family should ever have to endure that kind of pain. And the Petito family certainly deserves answers and justice. But the way this story has captivated the nation has many wondering, why not the same media attention when people of color go missing?

NPR published a piece in which it referenced a 2016 study conducted by Zach Sommers, a sociologist who studies crime. His team analyzed news coverage of cases similar to Petito’s by major news outlets like CNN, the Chicago Tribune, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, and the Star Tribune. He compared their coverage to the FBI’s national database of missing persons and found that “white women were much more likely to be the subject of news coverage relative to their proportions among missing persons.”

Sommers noted that while white women constitute about a third of the national population, “half of the articles in the data set are just about white females alone.”

His study also found that the “coverage of missing white women was different in intensity,” meaning that these news outlets were “more likely to repeatedly report on particular stories of missing white women.”

Speaking of CNN, they published a piece on Thursday referencing Sommers’ study. But the report also pointed out:

According to 2020 FBI data, Black people make up 35% of missing persons reports but only 13% of the US population. White people, meanwhile, make up 54% of missing persons reports and 76% of the US population.

The racial bias the media has displayed in missing persons cases has been a point of contention in the black community for decades. Even as a kid, I noticed the difference in how cable news organizations cover these stories and heard adults complaining about the disparity.

Last year, I wrote a piece about a group of black Chicago activists who launched a campaign designed to bring awareness of black kidnapping victims. They argued that one of the most significant contributors to the problem is the fact that the media neglects to give these stories the attention they deserve.

The problem isn’t that the media covers white women – people like Petito deserve to have their stories told. Moreover, it would be unreasonable to assume that major media outlets could cover each separate missing persons case. However, the fact that the press ignores every group except white women is an issue.

That being said, Joy Reid, CNN, and NPR are completely full of it.

In fact, none of these media activists pretending to clutch their pearls about the lack of coverage of minority women who go missing actually care about the issue. People’s actions tend to reveal what they truly care about and in this case, the proof is in the proverbial pudding. The reality is that the media is complaining about the media not covering stories about missing minority persons.

If each of these media organizations and personalities actually viewed these disparities as a problem, they would use their vast platforms to bring attention to black and brown women who go missing. It would be easy. They could do regular segments on the matter. They could do yeoman’s work in contributing the solution.

But they don’t.

As soon as the Petito case is resolved and the nation moves on, each of these people will go back to doing what they do best: Pushing their political agenda. Meanwhile, the stories of the people they pretend to care about will continue to be ignored – until the next white woman goes missing and they eagerly pounce on the opportunity to push racism again.



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CNN Diagnoses ‘White Woman Syndrome’ in Coverage of Gabby Petito Case

On Wednesday, just days following the tragic discovery of missing woman Gabby Petito’s body and the autopsy ruling her death a homicide, CNN’s New Day aired a segment in shocking bad taste accusing society of suffering from “missing white woman syndrome.” The guest on the show, journalist Mara Schiavocampo, began by claiming, “This isn’t saying Gabby Petito is not important,” and then went on to complain about the way the media has relentlessly covered her story.

“When everybody knows their face, when everyone knows the world is looking for them, it makes a real difference,” she said. This, of course, is a good thing, and assisted in the search for Petito. However, Schiavocampo interpreted the national media attention as a flaw in the nation’s “value system”:

 

 

 And this is what we’re seeing with the value system, society’s larger value system of white women being valued heavily and women of color not being valued as much comes through the media because a lot of the decisions about what’s being covered is made largely by newsrooms led by white men. And that’s the core of the problem here, is that this reflects the value system.

Yes, that’s right. Covering the Petito tragedy is just another symptom of systemic racism, and this type of media coverage is directly endangering women of color, according to Schiavocampo: “This makes them less safe. Perpetrators, predators know that if you want to get away with murder, you seek the victim that no one is going to look for. So this has very real implications for women who are walking around today.”

After playing a clip from 2004 in which the late journalist Gwen Ifill referred to this phenomenon as “missing white woman syndrome,” co-host Brianna Keilar asked Schiavocampo, “what’s changed?”

“Nothing has changed since then,” responded Schiavocampo. “I’ve covered tons of crime and I can spot a ‘perfect victim’ from a mile away. I could have told you this Gabby Petito story was going to blow up because we all know who gets attention. We all know who gets coverage. That has to change.”

Curiously, Schiavocampo did not have a problem with the statistical underrepresentation of men in missing persons cases: in 2020, 35,000 more men than women over 21 went missing.   It doesn’t quite fit with her narrative that the problem is racism.

As the nation grieves alongside the Petito family and anxiously awaits new developments in the story, it is stunning to see such bitterness from pundits who can only think about fairness in the wake of a young woman’s murder.

CNN was not alone in using the Petito tragedy to push charges of racism. On ABC’s Good Morning America, co-host T.J. Holmes similarly ranted about “the media’s seeming infatuation with missing white women.”

This segment was sponsored by AT&T and USAA.

The full transcript of the segment is below. Click expand to read:

New Day
09/22/21
07:47:10 AM

JOHN BERMAN: The national focus on the story of Gabby Petito, whose remains were identified yesterday in Wyoming, has generated a parallel conversation about how much attention is given to white women who go missing versus the amount of attention and resources given to cases involving women of color. According to the FBI, there were nearly 55,000 adults who went missing last year where the person was believed to be in danger or had gone missing involuntarily, kidnapping. More than 15,000 were black, while more than 34,000 were white, which includes Latinos, as the FBI doesn’t have a separate category for them. So, are these numbers reflected in all the coverage or national attention? Joining us now: journalist and host of the podcast Run Tell This, Mara Schiavocampo. Mara, thanks so much for being here, great to see you.

MARA SCHIAVOCAMPO: Thanks for having me. 

BERMAN: Look, the Gabby Petito story is interesting and raises all kinds of questions. There are things that need to be investigated and discovered there. This isn’t saying that that story is not important. But…

SCHIAVOCAMPO: Well, thank you for starting that way because that’s important to note. This isn’t saying that Gabby Petito is not important. What it is saying is that there is an overrepresentation in media when white women go missing and an underrepresentation in media when black, brown and indigenous people go missing. So for example, Laci Peterson, Natalee Holloway, Chandra Levy, these are all household names. We can all think of their faces when we say their names, but I’m willing to bet no one watching or listening can name one single black or brown woman who went missing who became a household name. And there are comparable examples of young, beautiful, middleclass women where every other factor is aligned with, say, Gabby Petito, but the only differentiator is race. So for example, Nikki Fitts, 32-year-old mother in California went missing in 2016. How many people know her name? Her 2-year-old daughter went missing with her. That child is still missing to this day. So we are talking about representation. 

BRIANNA KEILAR: This isn’t just – I mean, you might look at media coverage, or a layperson might look at media coverage and say, okay, those are the stories that get blown up and that get covered. But what is the harm? What is the harm of it? 

SCHIAVOCAMPO: Yeah. So unlike with other stories that maybe are over or underrepresented, this actually has real-life implications for women of color. Why? This makes them less safe, because perpetrators – predators know that if you want to get away with murder, you seek the victim that no one is going to look for. So this has very real implications for women who are walking around today. Also, when there is all of this media attention, that puts pressure on law enforcement, that directs resources to these searches. It increases reward money. So these women are much more likely to be found because of the media attention. 

BERMAN: That’s really interesting you say that. Leyla Santiago, who’s down in Florida covering this for us said that as far as she can tell the FBI and law enforcement presence yesterday was greater than she had seen in the days before. 

SCHIAVOCAMPO: Media is very, very powerful. When the light is shone on these women, and no one is saying they don’t deserve it, but other women deserve it as well, when everybody knows their face, when everyone knows that the world is looking for them, it makes a real difference.
And this is what we’re seeing when the value system, society’s larger value system of white women being valued heavily and women of color not being valued as much comes through the media because a lot of the decisions about what’s being covered is made largely by newsrooms led by white men. And that’s the core of the problem here, is that this reflects the value system. 

KEILAR: I think also separately from women of the George Floyd case and all of the resources that got mobilized outside of that department, they wanted to make sure that they had their best shot at a top notch prosecution. But, look, this is — this is something that we have seen before, right. This is actually a term that was the late great Gwen Ifill who we miss very dearly, came up with. She talked about this at a journalists of color conference back in 2004. So let’s listen to that. 

(Begin recorded segment)

SUZANNE MALVEAUX: I think at the time when, ‘94 in Rwanda, we were looking at, you know, Nancy Kerrigan and Tonya Harding and Wayne Bobbitt, everybody knows what happened to Bobbitt, you know. 

GWEN IFILL: I call it the missing white woman syndrome. If there’s a missing white woman, we’re going to cover that, every day. 

MALVEAUX: It’s true. 

(End recorded segment)

KEILAR: What’s changed? 

SCHIAVOCAMPO: Yeah, nothing has changed since then. And, you know, we miss Gwen Ifill, because she was a truth teller. She told the truth. I’ve covered tons of crime and I can spot a ‘perfect victim’ from a mile away. I could have told you this Gabby Petito story was going to blow up because we all know who gets attention. We all know who gets coverage. That has to change. Imagine the men, women and children in the community where Gabby Petito went missing who know that for the last ten years 700 indigenous people have gone missing and nobody has said a word and one missing white woman turns up in their backyard, and the world pays attention. That is insulting.

KEILAR: Can I ask you a question though, just about part of the story if it’s something that benefits all women, which is this 911 call, we know the call was about Brian Laundrie allegedly hitting her, and you look at the Moab police tape, right. And it looks like she’s going to be the one who gets in trouble. I wonder what this says for all women, though, about — and for policing when it comes to how they should be approaching these domestic violence incidents and how perhaps they should be asking more questions. 

SCHIAVOCAMPO: It is very important to have these conversations. And this is a sisterhood, right, the sisters support each other. But what a lot of folks are pointing out is that the rules don’t apply equally. And that’s what we all want. We want all women to be protected. We want all women to be searched for when they disappear. 

KEILAR: We have to think about this as we cover this. Mara Schiavocampo, always lovely to have you. Thank you. 

SCHIAVOCAMPO: Thank you. Good to see you guys.



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CNN Celebrates Professor Lecturing Ted Cruz on ‘Racist’ TX Voter ID Law

CNN celebrated a law professor in a congressional hearing yesterday telling Senator Ted Cruz that Texas’s voter ID law was “racist.” 

During a Senate hearing on “restoring the Voting Rights Act” Wednesday, Democrats called on liberal law professors like USC’s Franita Tolson to make their case that Texas’s law requiring voters show identification that they are who they say they are before voting was somehow racist to blacks and Latinos.

On CNN’s New Day Thursday morning, co-host John Berman brought on Tolson, who’s also an elections analyst for the network, to praise her for sticking it to Cruz.

Berman hailed Tolson going “toe to toe” in a “fiery exchange” with Cruz over Texas’s voter ID law. He played the clip, teasing it like it was a wrestling match: “A college professor joins us next on her face-off with Senator Ted Cruz,” he touted.

In the clip shown, Cruz asks Tolson the straightforward question: are voter ID laws “racist”? 

 

 

After Tolson told the Republican it “depends” Cruz followed up by asking her to back up her claims. That’s when her clearly partisan positions were revealed:

CRUZ:  So what voter I.D. Laws are racist? 

TOLSON: Apologies, Senator Cruz, your state of Texas. I’m not saying the entire state of Texas. 

CRUZ: You said my state of Texas. You tell me about the Texas voter I.D. Laws that are racist. 

TOLSON: The fact the law was put in place to diminish the political power of Latinos with racist intent and have been found to have — 

CRUZ: You’re asserting that. What is the evidence of that? 

TOLSON: The federal district court that first resolved the constitutionality of Texas’ voter I.D. Law. 

Right after this in the clip shown, two other Democrat witnesses agreed with Tolson that voter ID laws can be racist. Berman marveled at the liberal professors and lawyers schooling the Republican, suggesting to Tolson Cruz had ulterior motives, which the CNN election analyst agreed with:

BERMAN: Joining us is the professor who brought receipts, Franita Tolson, CNN election analyst and vice Dean of USC law school. Dean, thank you so much for being with us. I’m going to ask you to do the impossible here. But put yourself in the senator’s brain, Ted Cruz’s brain there, what do you think he was trying to get out of that discussion? 

TOLSON: I think he wanted me and my colleagues to be in a fund-raising video, he wanted some sound bite of us saying voter I.D. Laws which he noted several times throughout the hearing, they have broad support, some sound bite that we think they’re racist and don’t further the cause of election integrity. I refuse to be a sound bite and my colleagues as well. 

But she’s perfectly fine with CNN using her words as a political soundbite?

Afterwards Berman tried to appeal to the other side, by pointing out even Stacey Abrams agrees with certain election integrity laws. He asked Tolson what voter ID laws weren’t racist: “What voter I.D. Laws — where is the line?” he asked.

Tolson argued that Texas’s voter ID law was too restrictive because it required a “limited” number of identification options like a driver’s license and you couldn’t use things like a student ID to vote. So somehow this was discriminatory: “And it is clearly targeted towards making it harder for the people more likely to have those I.D.s–the students of color and students more generally tend to skew toward the Democratic party.”

She bashed the Texas “regime” as racist: “So the entire regime is targeted to make it very difficult for minorities to get the I.D. That they actually need in order to cast a ballot. It does not have to be that way.” She added that it wasn’t just voter I.D. but racial discrimination was a “recurring problem” for the state.

Berman followed up by asking the Democrat witness what “compromise” could be reached. Tolson explained that voter ID laws need to be crafted with giving minorities “political power” to not be racist. 

Of course, there was no mention by Berman of those election experts who disagreed with Tolson. CNN didn’t play soundbites from the Heritage Foundation’s Hans von Spakovsky, who also testified at the same hearing and “brought receipts” showing that the left’s hysteria over voter suppression is unfounded. But CNN doesn’t want its viewers to be informed or see both sides of an argument, they only want to hammer home a biased, Democrat agenda.

Read transcript below:

CNN New Day

9/23/21

JOHN BERMAN: A college professor joins us next on her face-off with Senator Ted Cruz. 

BERMAN: A law professor and CNN election law analyst went toe to toe with Senator Ted Cruz in a judiciary committee hearing in a fiery exchange about the Texas voter I.D. law. Listen. 

CRUZ: In your judgment, are voter I.D. laws, racist? Professor Tolson. 

PROF. FRANITA TOLSON: Thank you for that question. So it depends. One thing we have to stop doing is treating all voter I.D. laws as the same. 

CRUZ: I want to move quickly, so ‘it depends’ is your answer? 

TOLSON: Yes, that is my answer. 

CRUZ:  So what voter I.D. Laws are racist? 

TOLSON: Apologies, Senator Cruz, your state of Texas. I’m not saying the entire state of Texas. 

CRUZ: You said my state of Texas. You tell me about the Texas voter I.D. Laws that are racist. 

TOLSON: The fact the law was put in place to diminish the political power of Latinos with racist intent and have been found to have — 

CRUZ: You’re asserting that. What is the evidence of that? 

TOLSON: The federal district court that first resolved the constitutionality of Texas’ voter I.D. Law. 

CRUZ: Your view is voter I.D. Laws are racist. How about you, Mr. Yang? 

JOHN C. YANG, PRESIDENT, ASIAN AMERICANS ADVANCING JUSTICE: I agree with professor Tolson, voter I.D. laws can be racist. 

THOMAS SAENZ, PRESIDENT, COUNSEL, MEXICAN AMERICAN LEGAL DEFENSE FUND: There are some voter I.D. Laws that are racially discriminatory in intent. 

BERMAN: Joining us is the professor who brought receipts, Franita Tolson, CNN election analyst and vice Dean of USC law school. Dean, thank you so much for being with us. I’m going to ask you to do the impossible here. But put yourself in the senator’s brain, Ted Cruz’s brain there, what do you think he was trying to get out of that discussion? 

TOLSON: I think he wanted me and my colleagues to be in a fund-raising video, he wanted some sound bite of us saying voter I.D. Laws which he noted several times throughout the hearing, they have broad support, some sound bite that we think they’re racist and don’t further the cause of election integrity. I refuse to be a sound bite and my colleagues as well. 



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CNN Special or DNC Ad? ‘Price of Freedom’ Pushes Anti-Gun, Anti-NRA Agenda

On Sunday night, CNN put on a special from its CNN Films unit titled The Price of Freedom, which was a nasty dig at the National Rifle Association. The liberal news network gave the kind of slanted presentation one would expect, with the addition of swelling, dramatic music. Most of the soundbites were harsh critics of the NRA who were given a forum to complain that the pro-gun group has been too successful in pushing its agenda.

There were no advertisers in this two-hour special….just one long anti-NRA ad. The film closed with former Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords pushing for people to vote against the NRA. After the 90-minute film concluded, CNN’s Chris Cuomo — after noting that the NRA declined to participate — spoke with three gun control advocates in a pre-recorded segment.

In the opening tease, a clip of Democratic Congresswoman Lucy McBath set the tone as she declared: “You’re 25 times more likely to die by gun violence in the United States of America than any other developed nation in the world. What does this say about us as Americans? We’re just willing to let people die because we’re afraid of the NRA?”

Investigative journalist Frank Smyth added: “There’s no other single-issue lobby in the United States that has had as much success advancing its agenda against the wishes of the majority of the country. … The NRA has managed to convince millions of Americans that when people get killed in gun violence, that is the price of freedom.

The soundbites of CNN’s interview with former NRA president David Keene, along with stock footage of executive vice president Wayne LaPierre and former president Harlon Carter, were not nearly enough to counter misinformation pushed in the film as more than a dozen different critics of the pro-gun group were featured in soundbites throughout the film.

About half an hour into the presentation, Yohuru Williams of the University of St. Thomas and Caroline Light of Harvard University lamented the passage of Stand Your Ground laws that make it more difficult to convict people when they defend themselves from criminals, leading to Congresswoman McBath recalling the killing of her son, Jordan Davis, in 2012 by a man who confronted him at a gas station about playing loud music.

Even though the perpetrator, Michael Dunn, was convicted of murder and given a life prison sentence, the clips of McBath misleadingly made it sound like he was able to use the Stand Your Ground law to avoid prosecution.

Additionally, it was not mentioned that Davis was murdered in Florida where, as of 2019, the state had seen a substantial drop in the rates of most types of violent crime since the law was passed in 2005.

Later on, the documentary also repeated the recurring misinformation that an overwhelming majority of Americans support requiring background checks on all gun purchases even though this figure has repeatedly been demonstrated to be greatly exaggerated.

CNN also recalled that, in the 1960s, the NRA (under different leadership) supported efforts to disarm the Black Panthers in California, but did not mention that, in recent decades, the conservative group has aided African Americans living in places like Chicago and D.C. trying to defend their gun rights.

Average African Americans like Josephine Byrd, Otis McDonald, Mary Shepard, and Shaneen Allen have been assisted by the NRA. It has also been argued that gun control disproportionately hurts African Americans for a variety of reasons.

By contrast to its menacing music for the NRA, the music turned light to promote the leftist student activists who emerged (with aggressive CNN promotion) to fight the NRA after the Parkland school shooting. CNN glossed over the nasty things these students actually said on a CNN town hall, with no pushback, including that Sen. Marco Rubio looked like the Parkland shooter. 

 

 

Partial transcript follows:

CNN’s The Price of Freedom

September 19, 2021

9:00 p.m. Eastern

CONGRESSWOMAN LUCY MCBATH (D-GA): You’re 25 times more likely to die by gun violence in the United States of America than any other developed nation in the world. What does this say about us as Americans? We’re just willing to let people die because we’re afraid of the NRA?

FRANK SMYTH, INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALIST: There’s no other single-issue lobby in the United States that has had as much success advancing its agenda against the wishes of the majority of the country.

GREGORY JACKSON JR., COMMUNITY JUSTICE ACTION FUND: Gun violence is taking lives at a historic rate. It’s only getting worse and worse, and yet we’re focused on the right to bear arms and not the right to live. 

SMYTH: The NRA has managed to convince millions of Americans that when people get killed in gun violence, that is the price of freedom. Why has that happened? We have to start unpacking their myths.

(…)

9:35 p.m.

YOHURU WILLIAMS, UNIVERSITY OF ST. THOMAS: The NRA then begins pushing for legislation that would encourage people not only to be able to carry but to be able to use guns to defend their lives without fear of being prosecuted.

CAROLINE LIGHT, HARVARD UNIVERSITY: If you look at Stand Your Ground laws, any person who feels themselves under threat can use lethal violence. Stand Your Ground laws have proliferated across 33 states. The National Rifle Association was a key element in the passage of those laws.

JACKSON JR.: In all states where Stand Your Ground laws have been passed, we’ve seen gun related deaths and homicides increase. This violence continues to rage forward, and we’re watching individuals in our community being slain.

CONGRESSWOMAN MCBATH: Jordan was very compassionate and very, very sensitive. He had a lot of wisdom and a great deal of understanding and trying to figure out the world around him. The man who murdered my son was claiming that he feared for his life, that my son had a gun or stick, and he needed to defend himself, and the Stand Your Ground law gave him the ability to be able to do that.

AUDIO OF MALE REPORTER: Jordan Davis was shot and killed here at St. Meadows in Southside during an argument over loud music.

AUDIO OF FEMALE REPORTER: Dunn admitted to firing his weapon but said he did it in self-defense after he says he was threatened by the teens.

AUDIO OF MALE REPORTER: No gun was found in the teen’s SUV.

MCBATH: That man was using his implicit bias and his racism as a means to act out his violent tendencies towards my son and his friends because you can shoot to kill and ask questions later based a perception of threat under stand your ground.

(…)

10:01 p.m.

WES SILER, GUN OWNER: The NRA just does not represent gun owners anymore. My passion is hunting. And half of all NRA members are hunters. Why is the organization that claims to represent gun owners working against any effective safety measure capable to keep American children safe? We all want to see kids not get killed in schools — we all want to see crime be lower. We all want to live in a better, more perfect union. By making guns so partisan and saying politicians are trying to steal our guns, the NRA is preventing a larger conversation from happening.

LIGHT: More than 80 percent of U.S. adults support requiring background checks for all gun sales. And there’s no difference between gun owners and non-gun owners or by political affiliation.



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Dem lawmaker swiftly fact checks CNN host who claims Border Patrol agents used ‘rope,’ ‘lasso’ against migrants

Rep. Henry Cuellar (D-Texas) fact-checked a CNN host in real time Tuesday after the host repeated misleading claims that Border Patrol agents were using whips to corral Haitian migrants at the southern U.S. border.

What happened?

Cuellar — the congressional Democrat who has been the most outspoken about the border crisis — rebuffed CNN host Victor Blackwell for perpetuating misinformation about Border Patrol agents.

Blackwell accused Border Patrol agents, “mounted on horseback,” of “charging or chasing” migrants. He said one agent “appear[ed] to use what looks like a rope or lasso” against the migrants.

“Well, you know, certainly, we got to make sure we treat all the immigrants with respect and dignity,” Cuellar said. “But I will say this: Border Patrol has had those horse brigades for a while, they’ve had them for a while, number one.”

“Number two, they don’t carry whips and they do not carry lassos,” Cuellar continued. “I think the picture you’re talking about, at least the one I’ve seen is the rein, the rein of the horses.”

When pressed by Blackwell whether horse reins should be used against the migrants, Cuellar advertised caution against assuming the worst of Border Patrol agents.

“Well, again, if there was a problem, it should be investigated, and I think that’s it. But we cannot paint the Border Patrol with that same type of paintbrush,” Cuellar said. “Look, you know, what are they supposed to do? Just stand there and let everybody come in?”

“You know, they’re supposed to be enforcing the law,” he continued. “But again, as to how you enforce the law, you got to make sure you treat people with dignity and respect.”

What is the truth?

Pictures show that mounted Border Patrol agents maintaining security in Del Rio were not using whips, ropes, or lassos against the migrants. As Cuellar pointed out, agents were photographed holding the reins used to control a horse.

PAUL RATJE / AFP

Unfortunately for the anti-Border Patrol narrative, it’s difficult to draw conclusions about behavior of Border Patrol agents from photographs, for they are missing the context necessary to ascertain what actually happened. While a few images purportedly suggest misbehavior, video does not irrefutably corroborate what Democrats and some media members have suggested.

In the above photo, for example, the mounted Border Patrol agent appears to be guiding his horse by tugging on the rein, not using the rein against the migrant.

Still, the Department of Homeland Security has promised a swift investigation into actions of the mounted Border Patrol agents.





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CNN’s Brian Stelter: ‘Anti-democracy,’ ‘propagandist’ Trump forced network anchors to editorialize news coverage

Brian Stelter, CNN’s chief media correspondent, told a college journalism class that former President Donald Trump is a “demagogue” and a “propagandist” — and that it was because of Trump’s “anti-democracy” stances that the left-wing network’s anchors began to editorialize news coverage in 2015, Fox News reported.

What are the details?

Stelter was interviewed earlier this month by former “Good Morning America” host Joan Lunden who is a guest lecturer at Lehigh University in Pennsylvania, Fox News said, adding that Lunden asked Stelter about CNN journalists injecting opinion into news coverage.

“Now that there are all these attacks on free press, and quite honestly attacks many times on the actual truth, have you had to change your stance in that now you kind of need to take a stance and give an opinion? … That maybe three, four years ago, you would have said, ‘I’m not going there,'” Lunden posed to Stelter, according to Fox News.

In response, the CNN media correspondent told her that his network began to venture into opinion land several years ago, Fox News said.

“Certainly pre-2015, there were times where anchors would speak directly to the camera and take a point of view on certain subjects,” he noted, according to the cable network. “What you see a lot more of since 2015 are these analysis segments, these perspective segments where we are looking straight into the camera, we’re talking directly to the viewer, and we are assessing the information out there, trying to tell you what we see is true, what we know to be true, and now also sometimes what we stand for.”

Stelter did not shy away from demonizing Trump as the reason for CNN’s shift toward more direct editorialization of the news, Fox News said.

“When you’ve got a propagandist, a demagogue running for president, then becoming president, and taking pretty clear anti-democracy positions, I think the idea was understandable that anchors … talked about democracy, talked about truth, talked about decency,” Stelter told the students, according to the cable network. “I don’t think it’s partisan to be pro-democracy, pro-decency, pro-truth. I do think there are topics that are essential to America and journalism that must be defended, and I think that’s how CNN’s evolved where you have anchors like Anderson [Cooper] or Jake Tapper or in my little way, myself, who do take those stands.”

‘Two medias’

Stelter also said there are “two medias” in American journalism today — and, in fact, two Americas.

“We have two medias. We have two countries, two medias,” he said, according to Fox News. “We have a mainstream media — you know all the brands. We’re flawed, but we’re trying. And we have this alternative media structure in the country. … We have these two medias in one, and it creates a very, I think, confusing environment for the public.”

Anything else?

Stelter himself is well-known for mixing news with left-wing stances on air — and has been taken to task for it numerous times, including by an author he interviewed in July who ripped Stelter as “one of the reasons why people can’t stand the media.”

(H/T: The College Fix)





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